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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2002 (January-June) » HELP translation « Previous Next »

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Sean Neely (12-224-165-106.client.attbi.com - 12.224.165.106)
Posted on Monday, June 24, 2002 - 01:09 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Could anyone help me translate "by the grace of god go I"?

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James (209.48.182.219)
Posted on Monday, June 24, 2002 - 11:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Shean,

I'm at work right now and can't get to my dictionary. Just wanted you to know someone's working on this. I will forewarn you that the translation will most likely NOT be a word for word but will convey the meaning. English sayings do not always, actually rarely, translate into Irish word for word.

Give me another 24 hours and we'll have something to start with.

Le meas,

James

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James (wcs3.norfolk.nipr.mil - 198.26.132.99)
Posted on Tuesday, June 25, 2002 - 11:25 am:   Edit Post Print Post

OK-less than 24 hours later, 5 hours of sleep and dictionary in hand--this is what I come up with:

Le grásta Dé téim mé. Literally, "With God's Grace I go".

As a former Southern Baptist and converted Catholic, I can't help but make this observation:

I have always heard this expression as bearla to be "There but for the grace of God, go I." It was usually said when discussing another's misfortune as a means of acknowledging that God is all that stands between us and a similar suffering.

Your phrase indicates a more personal acceptance that it is by God's grace that we exist at all; suffering or otherwise.

I believe that concept would be better expressed by:

Tá mé le grásta Dé

I am not sure which you intended in your request for a translation but I must say I rather prefer your version, intended or otherwise.

I'm just a lonely self teaching, ever learning student with nothing better to do with my morning. With that in mind, don't commit this to any permanent fixture until you've seen a response from a few of the true Irish speakers that regularly contribute to this site. I would be willing to bet that there is a Seanfhocal that expresses one, or both of these concepts.

Le meas,

James

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Aonghus (vpn.parthus.com - 62.221.5.1)
Posted on Wednesday, June 26, 2002 - 04:18 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Le grásta Dé téim mé.

James - the "mé" is redundant, because téim already implies me.

I would say "Téim le grásta Dé" I go with God's grace

I am with God's grace (meaning I exist because of it) would be
Táim, le grásta Dé.

I am would be
Táim , le grásta Dé.

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james (wcs3.norfolk.nipr.mil - 198.26.132.99)
Posted on Wednesday, June 26, 2002 - 12:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Aonghus,

I was curious about that. In Spanish pronouns are used with their conjugated verbal counterparts on a fairly regular basis. Guess that isn't the case with Irish. Go raibh mile maith agat for the clarification.

Also, is Táim a standard conjunction of Tá and me, or is it used on a more regional basis? I am aware of it but didn't want to confuse Sean with a regional conjunction.

And one more bit, le do thoil. Téim--how does it differ from Táim?

Again,

Thanks for all your help. Couldn't do this without you and the others.

Le meas,

James.

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Larry (host213-122-53-160.in-addr.btopenworld.com - 213.122.53.160)
Posted on Thursday, June 27, 2002 - 12:10 am:   Edit Post Print Post

James, a chara

Táim = I am
Téim = I go

Le meas,
Larry

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Aonghus (vpn.parthus.com - 62.221.5.1)
Posted on Thursday, June 27, 2002 - 03:59 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Táim & Tá mé are both in use

Téim is the first person singular in the present tense of the verb dul, to go

Táim is the first person singular in the present tense of the verb bheith, to be

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