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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2002 (January-June) » Can you translate this for me? « Previous Next »

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KatNMel (proxy.ia3.marketscore.com - 66.119.33.135)
Posted on Thursday, March 28, 2002 - 04:33 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Okay, my friend said this to my friend... and we dont know what it means. So if you can PLEASE tell us!! "slan leat mo ghra" **Thanks a Ton**

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Larry (host213-122-168-206.in-addr.btopenworld.com - 213.122.168.206)
Posted on Thursday, March 28, 2002 - 05:56 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

It means "Bye my love"

Le meas,
Larry.

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Jacqui (208.45.247.252)
Posted on Sunday, March 31, 2002 - 06:44 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I have been told many times that Iam "Fa". This is an old gaelic word, but I don't understand what it truly means. Having looked it up everywhere you are my last hope...it has to do with "having the force of mu?" I don't understand this either. Is this the same as the english term ESP? Thankyou

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Seosamh (dialup-64.158.187.4.dial1.newyork1.level3.net - 64.158.187.4)
Posted on Sunday, March 31, 2002 - 09:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Fa? Mu? I've never heard either word, in English or Irish, that I can think of. Sorry.

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Jacqui (208.45.247.223)
Posted on Monday, April 01, 2002 - 12:08 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Thankyou Seosamh, I looked up "Fa" in the Gaelic Dictionary, and it said,"prep. having the force of mu, but not used except in: fa chomhair, opposite: fe leth, apart, separately": Fa dheo'idh, at last and similar phrases
Then I found "Mu" and it said, "prep. about, around, of, concerning, on account of, for: mu'n cuairt, about, round about: mu thimcheall, about, around, concerning: mu choinneamh, opposite
I have been told this by several irish friends of mine, who realize that I have sort of ESP. ....So it was my understanding that being "Fa" meant the same thing in gaelic. But I wanted to fully understand what is meant by this gaelic term. I'am bound to find out what it means if I keep searching.

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Seosamh Mac Bhl. (dialup-64.158.186.81.dial1.newyork1.level3.net - 64.158.186.81)
Posted on Monday, April 01, 2002 - 10:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Those are words in Scots Gaelic. A couple of them actually did occur to me, but those are still prepositions with no meaning I can think of that relate to what youre describing. Haven't a clue. Maybe it's local English slang somewhere, short for fabulous or something. Couldn't be fey or fay, could it? Use your ESP and a good search engine.

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Jacqui (208.45.246.242)
Posted on Tuesday, April 02, 2002 - 02:56 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Seosamn, hahahahahaha that's good. I don't consider myself as physic....but I know I can make one prediction, you have a great sence of humor. Of course Iam fabulous! But I did find all this in an Irish Gaelic Dictionary, not a Scots Gaelic. I will keep checking....

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Seosamh (nyf-ny12-220.rasserver.net - 206.216.92.220)
Posted on Thursday, April 04, 2002 - 08:01 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Yes, it's a hodgepodge of prepostions from different dialects -- 'fe' is Munster. Nothing there that will help you, however.

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S. Nic Rabhartaigh (adsl-64-108-133-138.dsl.milwwi.ameritech.net - 64.108.133.138)
Posted on Monday, April 08, 2002 - 04:00 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dear Jacqui
Did people actually spell "fa" for you when they described you as such. Perhaps they meant "fey" which is an English word?

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Jacqui (208.45.246.212)
Posted on Friday, April 12, 2002 - 09:03 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dear S. Nic Rabhartaigh, thankyou for your inquiry. Iam not sure of the spelling, but it is pronounced "fey" and if the e were a long a. Thank's once again......But I am beginning to wonder where the word came from.

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Jacqui (208.45.246.214)
Posted on Saturday, April 13, 2002 - 04:49 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dear S. Nic Rabhartaigh, I think I found the answer, thanks to you....you were right, it is English, and got me thinking, "Look it up in the dictionary!" I did, and it means: marked by a foreboding of calamity, visionary, and (I don't care for this one) crazy....but this drove me crazy trying to figure it all out. Now why I was told it was old gaelic, ???? thankyou so much for the insight you gave me.

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Fintan (lisp-ip73.lisp.com.au - 203.21.133.73)
Posted on Sunday, April 14, 2002 - 09:08 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Jacqui a chara,

'Fey' is a word ultimately derived from 'faerie' or 'fairy', referring to the 'Good People', the 'Wee Folk', the 'Slua na Sí', etc. The tradition in days of yore was to NOT refer to 'them' by any direct names other than nice, jolly happy ones; basically so that 'they' wouldn't turn yer cows purple and turn yer crops into dung and have you waking up a different shape to when you went to bed. *grin*

So, 'fey' is a word (becoming rarer these days) used to refer to those mortals as have the 'second sight' or any one of dozens of terms for seemingly spooky paranormal powers. It gradually came to mean, also, someone who seems to be 'off with the fairies'.

Do sheirbhíseach,
'Fintan'

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Jacqui (208.45.247.253)
Posted on Tuesday, April 16, 2002 - 07:23 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Fintan! Thankyou so much. I loved reading every part of your message. When I asked the same friend of mine who called me this word to begin with why in the ditionary it said "Crazy" she said, "Because it was felt that anyone with "second sight" "paranormal powers" was thought to be "crazy".....So I guess Iam "off with the fairies" whenever I suspect something to do with my "second sight". The word "coincidence" can be used only so much when you suddently start asking yourself, "How is that I already knew about this?" Now I have finally accepted this "gift?" and see how it all goes..each time it happens. Thankyou once again.....

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Gearoid O hArgain (p95.as1.cork1.eircom.net - 159.134.245.95)
Posted on Sunday, April 28, 2002 - 05:21 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Im looking for the "Irish" for "String" (as in guitar string)

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Ó Dúill (p56.as1.qkr.cork1.eircom.net - 159.134.180.56)
Posted on Sunday, April 28, 2002 - 05:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Téad [Tayd]

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Pól (server1.embryoninc.com - 66.152.218.225)
Posted on Monday, April 29, 2002 - 09:38 am:   Edit Post Print Post

For some reason, American bluegrass musicians use the word 'wire' for a guitar string, and say 'I tore a wire' when they've broken a string.
Pól

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Gearoid O hArgain (p765.as2.cork1.eircom.net - 159.134.218.253)
Posted on Monday, April 29, 2002 - 07:07 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

O`Duill,
Go raibh mile maith agat.
The reason i was looking for the translation,is that an irish group in holland are bringing out a new C.D.,and were looking for the "Irish" for string,so I will pass it on.Look out for th C.D.

Mise le meas
Gearoid O`hArgain

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