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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2002 (January-June) » Translation please « Previous Next »

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Charlene Conley (otisvac-gate.o-t-i.net - 207.149.226.2)
Posted on Monday, March 18, 2002 - 12:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

my dad recently died and we are trying to decide what to put on his headstone. my mother would like to put "fantastic journey" in irish. If you ever met him, you would completely understand. Any ideas as what this would be translated?
much appreciated,
charlene

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Aonghus (vpn.parthus.com - 62.221.5.1)
Posted on Tuesday, March 19, 2002 - 06:12 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Aistear iontach

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Jo Ann Kellisch (na-proxysrvr1.alcoa.com - 147.154.232.3)
Posted on Wednesday, March 20, 2002 - 11:22 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I need the phraze "forever yours" translated into Irish Gaelic for an engraving on a ring for my fiance'. Please help. I don't want to screw this up. Thanks

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JoAnn Kellisch (na-proxysrvr1.alcoa.com - 147.154.232.3)
Posted on Wednesday, March 20, 2002 - 11:28 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Is Aistear iontach the translation for forever yours?

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James (wcs2-mcpherson.nipr.mil - 198.26.120.13)
Posted on Wednesday, March 20, 2002 - 05:13 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A JoAnn,

No, Aister iontach is in response to Charlene's request. It means "Fantastic (literally, wonderul) Journey".

I don't think you can do a word for word translation for "Forever Yours." A single word that translates the possesive nature of "yours" doesn't seem to exist as near as I can tell. You might try:

Go deo leat (Always with you)

Although, Choíche leat gives you the same translation, I don't think it conveys the intended message and is probably grammatically incorrect.

Now----having said all of that, I'm just getting my feet wet, so to speak, with this language. Sheosamh, Aonghus and Fintan (among many others) would be able to confirm or deny my interpretation. I mention those three by name because not much gets by them, they are regular contributors to this forum and I have learned much simply by their responses to other postings.

Bottom line---don't get it tattoo'ed on your rump (or anyhwere else for that matter) until you've heard from someone far more accomplished than I!!!

go n-éirí leat.

Le meas,

James

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Larry (host213-122-86-71.in-addr.btopenworld.com - 213.122.86.71)
Posted on Wednesday, March 20, 2002 - 05:52 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Yours ever = Do chara buan

Le meas,
Larry.

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Aonghus (vpn.parthus.com - 62.221.5.1)
Posted on Thursday, March 21, 2002 - 05:46 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Cara is a bit weak for a fiancé.
Jo anne, I answered your other post

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JoAnn.Kellisch@alcoa.com (na-proxysrvr3.alcoa.com - 147.154.232.5)
Posted on Thursday, March 21, 2002 - 08:10 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Well, thank you all for your thoughts. Maybe you know of an expression that would convey my love for mike. If you have any thoughts please let me know. Keep in mind it must be engraved on the inside of a claddah band.

Thanks,
Jo Ann
Please feel free to e-mail me.

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Dennis King (12-228-30-223.client.attbi.com - 12.228.30.223)
Posted on Thursday, March 21, 2002 - 11:52 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Fiancé, an ea? Mar a dúirt actress áirithe, "I was with my fiancé last night. That's French for an fear a bhfuil mé ag bualadh craicinn leis an mhí seo."

Anyway, go with Aonghus's "Go deo leat". That's solid.

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Larry (host213-122-77-228.in-addr.btopenworld.com - 213.122.77.228)
Posted on Friday, March 22, 2002 - 01:59 am:   Edit Post Print Post

... and you don't think that a fiancé is a friend?? Is ait an mac an saol, a chairde.

Le meas,
Larry.

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Aonghus (vpn.parthus.com - 62.221.5.1)
Posted on Friday, March 22, 2002 - 04:14 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I think a fiancé is a friend, and then more!
What I said was do Chara buan does not convey the intention to be an integral part of the other person that "Forever yours" is intended to convey.

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Susan OConnor (gee-ts2-2500.tpgi.com.au - 203.58.6.3)
Posted on Friday, March 22, 2002 - 06:50 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I would very much appreciate your help in a translation of the writing on our family's (O'Connor) heraldic shield. My mother-in-law bought this shield on a visit to Ireland and has lost the information that came with the shield. The writing is difficult to read but I believe it says:

Õ Óia gac aon cabair

Thank you Susan O'Connor

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Aonghus (vpn.parthus.com - 62.221.5.1)
Posted on Friday, March 22, 2002 - 08:17 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I found this when I searched in Google
http://www.cproots.com/surnameorigins/nameslz/namesoconnor.htm


"Ó Dhia gach aon cabhair" (From God Every Help).

I assume that the shield you have is using a gaelic font, which means the "h" is represented by a dot over the previous letter, and the D would be similar to an O but with a vertical line on top

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Susan OConnor (gee-ts4-2500.tpgi.com.au - 203.58.6.7)
Posted on Saturday, March 23, 2002 - 02:10 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dear Aonghus

Thank you very much, Sheila will be very pleased to have this informatin.

Regards

Sue O'Connor

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bill murray (rollingrock.taconic.net - 205.231.149.33)
Posted on Saturday, March 23, 2002 - 06:56 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

maybe i've been in the wrong section, "house name needed"
since dec. 2001. with no response. looks like there is more activity in this section. can anyone help with a translation of "house in the woods" or " house in the forest". you see where i'm headed.
thank you for your help.

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (proxy-server3.ul.ie - 136.201.1.52)
Posted on Sunday, March 24, 2002 - 10:24 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Bill, a chara,

I would offer you 'Teach na Coille', Irish generally going for a case rendering of an English preposition and singular, before 'wood/s'.

'Teach na Foraoise' would be the equivilent in relation to 'forest'.

The first word, Teach, may also be properly spelt in both renderings, 'Toigh', or 'Tigh'.

The form 'Tí', while in use, is a little excessive.

My own preference would be 'Toigh na Coille'.

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bill murray (rollingrock.taconic.net - 205.231.149.33)
Posted on Sunday, March 24, 2002 - 06:23 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Seosamh,
Thank you for your response.
Would "cottage in the woods" be different than "house in the woods"?
If so would you be so kind as to advise me.
Again, thank you.

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (proxy-server3.ul.ie - 136.201.1.52)
Posted on Monday, March 25, 2002 - 05:42 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Just replace Teach/Toigh/Tigh with 'Tigín' :

'Tigín na Coille'

or

'Tigín na Foraoise'

and there you have it.

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