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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2002 (January-June) » Irish and French language... « Previous Next »

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Aurélie BARROIS (curie.noos.net - 212.198.0.93)
Posted on Friday, March 15, 2002 - 05:19 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I am looking for information about the similarities between French language and Irish language (vocabulary, syntax...). The question is : What makes Irish and French so close together, and so different from English ? Give me examples, please. Does learning Irish and French at the same age (at school in Ireland) help to learn French ?
Thank you for answering by e-mail at barrois.aurelie@libertysurf.fr

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Dennis King (12-228-30-223.client.attbi.com - 12.228.30.223)
Posted on Saturday, March 16, 2002 - 02:57 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Je ne crois point que l'irlandais soit plus "proche" du français que de l'anglais. A mhalairt ar fad. (Au contraire.) L'irlandais est très excentrique vis-à-vis toutes les autres langues de l'Europe, sauf, bien sûr, les autres langues celtiques.

But note that English, unlike French, has at least one important grammatical similarity to Irish, Welsh, etc., namely the continuous tenses:

Tá mé ag ithe. = I am eating.
Ithim. = I eat.

En français on dit "je mange" tout simplement dans les deux cas, bien qu'on peut dire "je suis en train de manger" à la rigueur.

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bob clark (csc06webink01s.keybank.com - 156.77.100.117)
Posted on Sunday, March 17, 2002 - 11:42 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I am a native speaker of American English, and one who has studied French, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, German, and now most recently Irish. From my perspective, English and French are much closer that English and Irish, and Irish is about 10 times more difficult to learn for an English speaker.

While a Germanic language, English vocabulary was influenced by the Latin of the Romans, and again later in its history by a child of Latin: French. While French pronunciation can be a challenge for the English speaker, lots of French words look like their English equivalents. One can learn to recognize components of words and easily convert them to English counterparts (e.g., ment=ly, simplement=simply).

While I believe experience from learning any second language can be an aid to learning a third or fourth, I see no close relationship between French and Irish that would make study of one complement the other. They are both very worthy of study, however.

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Fintan (bay45.lith.lisp.com.au - 203.21.133.55)
Posted on Sunday, March 17, 2002 - 08:13 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A chairde,

One similarity between Gaeilge and (if I recall correctly) French, is that both are VSO languages (meaning Verb-Subject-Object); whereas English is, I think, a Subject-Verb-Object or SVO language. I could be wrong though.....*gáire*

Wow, Dennis! Fluent in French AND Irish, wish I was that cliste...*grin*.....

Slán,
'Fintan'

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Ó Dúill (p65.as1.qkr.cork1.eircom.net - 159.134.180.65)
Posted on Thursday, March 21, 2002 - 04:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Bonjour tout le monde!
Je pense que cette tribune est pour les langues irlandais et anglais et n'est pas pour la langue française ou les autres langues européenes. Ma faute! ;) *rire*
Oui, je suis d'accord avec Denis quand il a dit que l'irlandais et les autres langues celtiques sont vraiment différentes à les langues d'Europe. Oui, c'est vrai que l'irlandais et la française sont langues VSO (Verbe-Sujet-Objet) et l'anglais est langue SVO.

Aontaim le Denis nuair a dúirt sé go bhfuil mórán difear idir an Ghaeilge (agus na teangacha eile Ceilteach) agus na teangacha Eorpach ; agus le Fintan faoin bpointe de theanga BAC (Briathar-Ainmní-Cuspóra) agus de theanga ABC.

Basically to sum-up I agree with both Denis and Fintan! (I know i'm lazy :))

Yours,
Is mise,
le meas,
(And the *shortest* bit) Je vous prie de recevoir, Monsieur/Madame, l'assurance de mes sentiments distingués.
Maintenant, je suis TRÈS FATIGUÉ! :|
Colm.

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Ó Dúill (p408.as1.qkr.cork1.eircom.net - 159.134.181.152)
Posted on Thursday, March 21, 2002 - 05:48 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Excuse-moi! Je suis désolé!
Le français est langue SVO comme l'anglais. L'irlandais est langue VSO. Ma faute
Gabh mo leathscéal! Táim brónach. Is amadán mise.
Is é an Ghaeigle teanga BAC. Is iad an Bhéarla agus Fraincis teangacha ABC.
Excuse Me!
French is a SVO language like English. Irish is VSO.
Sorry for the confusion!
Colm.

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Fintan (neta.lisp.com.au - 203.21.133.124)
Posted on Thursday, March 21, 2002 - 06:21 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Cholm a chara,
No, 'twas my fault. As I said, I wasn't sure about French being VSO. D'oh!

Mea culpa,
Fintan

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nick chalk (mtl-hse-ppp174658.qc.sympatico.ca - 65.94.121.106)
Posted on Monday, March 25, 2002 - 12:53 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Français
--------
Moi je parle Français, moi depuit que je suis très jeune, et je peut pas voir des similarités entre l'Irlandais et le Français. C'est domâge car je viens juste de commencer à apprendre l'Irlandais et cela prouve d'être assez dure pour moi. Comme Colm a déja dit, le Français est une langue SVO, pas VSO. En effet, le syntax du Français est très proche du syntax Anglais.

English
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I too speak French, me since I was quite young, and I do not see any similarities between Irish and French. It's a shame because is just started Irish and this is proving to be difficult for me. Like Colm already said, French is an SVO language, not VSO. In fact, French syntax is quite close to English syntax.

Gaeilge
--------
Ní triailfidh mé!

slán,
nick

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nick chalk (mtl-hse-ppp174658.qc.sympatico.ca - 65.94.121.106)
Posted on Monday, March 25, 2002 - 01:02 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Français
--------
Oh! Je viens juste de penser à une similarité. Les adjectives dans le Français viennent des fois APRÈS le nom. Mais pas toujours. Et quand même, cette similarité ne serait pas trop utile pour un étudiant de l'Irlandais.

English
-------
God, it's late. Adjective sometimes come after the noun, not like English.

slán,
nick

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Daniel (ras17-p301.hfa.netvision.net.il - 62.0.115.61)
Posted on Friday, May 03, 2002 - 09:49 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Reading this I must make something clear - French and Irish do have something similar but it's not that they r VSO languages.

Rather there is a Gaelic substartum in French and the similarity is expressed in the ordinarily addopted cleft sentences - like in the English - It is he who bought the book.

C'est moi que...

Irish: Is mise ...

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Seosamh (nyf-ny1-160.rasserver.net - 207.221.74.160)
Posted on Friday, May 03, 2002 - 11:27 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Un soustrat gaelique?? Ou voulez-vous dire "soustrat gaulois/celtique"? Gaulish or Celtic, maybe, but not Gaelic.

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