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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2002 (January-June) » New student « Previous Next »

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Doug Slauson (aca46893.ipt.aol.com - 172.164.104.147)
Posted on Saturday, January 12, 2002 - 12:22 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Cad é mar atá tú? And therein lies my question. I've only started learning within the past couple of weeks. First, I picked up the book/tape series "Irish on Your Own" which states that the phrase "Dia Duit" is rarely used, unless under very formal circumstances. Granted this series is "Ulster-based" but I have seen in this meduim, as well as several others, that many are using this greeting. At the beginning of this message, I used the "How are you" that this series states is the most common greeting amongst native speakers. All other series don't mention the "native speakers" issue and just give the "Dia Duit" phrase and the general greeting. What thinkest thou, O native speakers and advanced learners?

By the way, I'm really enthused to find a board relating to this language. I've always wanted to learn and am encouraged by the surprising quantity of resources.

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Seosamh (1cust230.tnt52.nyc3.da.uu.net - 67.193.94.230)
Posted on Saturday, January 12, 2002 - 12:43 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I think you've got it basically right. Cad é mar atá tú? seems to be how people most often greet each other in the North, at least younger people. Dia duit is more common elsewhere, although it is more often said as Dia dhuit. Traditional speakers have a good store of greetings but may just start a conversation with a remark about the weather or some other topic.

My favorite greeting is Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill's aunt. She says that before her aunt opens the door she says, 'An de bheoaibh nó de mhairibh thú?' (Are you of the living or the dead?)

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (proxy-server3.ul.ie - 136.201.1.52)
Posted on Saturday, January 12, 2002 - 07:20 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Fáilte romhat chun na Gaeilge, a Doug.

Go mborra Dia sibh thall an bhliain úr seo 2002, a Sheosaimh.

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Larry (host213-1-180-207.btinternet.com - 213.1.180.207)
Posted on Saturday, January 12, 2002 - 09:07 am:   Edit Post Print Post

For what it's worth, I've found that many government departments in Ireland answer the 'phone with "Dia duit" as an alternative to the more basic "hello".

Le meas,
Larry.

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James (wcs1.norfolk.nipr.mil - 198.26.132.101)
Posted on Saturday, January 12, 2002 - 12:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

While in Conemara my wife and I heard "La go maith" quite a bit. It may have be "Ta an la go maith" but the "ta an" got lost somewhere in the speech pattern. I was wondering if this was regional or another one of the many options.

Go raibh mo agat.

Le meas,

James

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Seosaimhín Nic Rabhartaigh (adsl-64-109-205-129.dsl.milwwi.ameritech.net - 64.109.205.129)
Posted on Saturday, January 12, 2002 - 03:16 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia leat Doug!
(May God be with you, Doug!) : a greeting
Báil ó Dhia ar an obair!
(Blessings from God on the work! : another greeting)
Agus tú ag foghlaim Gaeilge.(And you learning Irish.)

Nuair a bhí mé ag staidéar Gaeilge san Ollscoil (when I was studying Irish at University)
idir 1985 agus 1989 ( between 1985 and 1989)
labhair mé i nGaeilge achán lá leis na daltaí eile.
(I spoke Irish every day with the other students)
Tháinig alán cuid acu as Tír Chónaill agus tuaisceart na tíre cosúil liom féin.
(A lot of them came from Donegal and the North of the country like myself)
Mar is gnáth le daoine óga bhí ár "lingo" féin againn.
( As is common among young people, we had our own "lingo")

In ionad "Caidé mar atá tú?" dúramar uilig "Caidé mar..? nó "dé mar..?"

Instead of " Caidé mar atá tú?" we all said " "Caidé mar..?" nó "dé mar..?"

Sílim go raibh an-tionchar ag Canúint Ghaoth Dóbhair ar ár gcuid cainte ag an am sin.
(I think that the Gweedore Dialect had a lot of influence on our speech at that time.)

Bhí an beannacht seo coitianta fiú ag na micléinn a bhí ag staidéar Canúint Chúige Mhumhain nó Canúint Chúige Chonnacht.
(this greeting was common even among the students who were studying the dialects of Munster or Connacht.)

"Password" isteach i gclub na cainteoirí Gaeilge a bhí i gceist i ndairíre.
( It was really a "password" into the Irish speakers club.)

It is one of the primary rules of linguistics that language is constantly changing to accomodate the needs of the speakers who use it. In fact, as the human being is quite lazy in ways, language changes reflect this by replacing more complicated structures with simpler ones. ( I hope Cailín sees this point as I recall she was worried about Irish people's accents and modes of expression while speaking English changing)

By replacing
" Caidé mar atá tú? ( greeting when addressing one person) or "Caidé mar atá sibh?" ( greeting when addressing more than one person) with
"Caidé mar......?" or "dé mar..?"

we were actually applying this rule of simplification, as our new form of the greeting dispensed with the necessity of identifying whether or not we, as individuals, were actually addressing one or more people! ( I laugh now as I realise how lazy this was!)

Different generations "trendy-ise" their speech in different ways regardless of what language they are communicating in. I would never have used this greeting to address an older person, however, nor would any of my friends as it would not have been appropriate.
I would not now use " Caidé mar..?" or " dé mar?" except with people I had been to University with.
So, this greeting has become fossilised in my lexicon and is only brought out on special occasions!

Tá súil agam go n-éiróidh go maith leat agus tú ag staidear an teanga is áille sa domhain.
( I hope you will get along well studying the loveliest language in the world)

Slán go fóill
Seosaí

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Doug Slauson (216.201.201.115)
Posted on Wednesday, January 16, 2002 - 01:57 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Go raibh míle maith agat! This explains much! My only problem is patience and sticking with managable bites. For some reason, I seem to want to know and understand all the dialects yesterday.

At any rate, there is a long road ahead and you all have helped a lot on my early steps.

By the way, to other new learners out there, I am already finding that listening to Raidió na Gaeltachta (www.rnag.ie) is an immense help.

Slan!

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Doug Slauson (ac97cb19.ipt.aol.com - 172.151.203.25)
Posted on Thursday, January 17, 2002 - 01:23 am:   Edit Post Print Post

On another note, and at a later time upon reading at home, I have to note that one of the biggest sources of confusion is the fact that not only are there distinct dialects, but that there are many different ways, in each dialect, that certain words are shortened or compressed. Case in point (to use my earlier example): Cad é mar atá tú? versus "Caidé mar..." There is also the "Cas tú?" (as given in "Irish On Your Own") versus the "Cad as tú?" (as given in "Teach Yourself Irish"). I could go on, but, while these are not completely confusing, it's admittedly a bit of a stumbling block for a novice.

Go raibh maith agat, slán go fóill, agus sláinte!

Doug

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Tracey (oak.may.ie - 149.157.1.55)
Posted on Friday, January 18, 2002 - 06:43 am:   Edit Post Print Post

One of the most popular greetings in a casual setting is - believe it or not - haigh! (hi). Its mainly used among younger speakers.

As a matter of interest, Doug, do you know how to reply if someone says 'Dia duit'(God be without you)? The answer to that would be: 'Dia is Muire duit' (God and Mary be with you). Should you want to answer that one (!) you'd say 'Dia is Muire is Pádraig duit' (God and Mary and Patrick with you). The litany doesn't end there!!! Next Bríd (St. Brigid) is drawn into it and after that you may add whatever Saint you wish!! The greeting can go on as long as you have a saint to fill the gap!

Tabhair aire,
Tracey

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