mainoff.gif
lastdyoff.gif
lastwkoff.gif
treeoff.gif
searchoff.gif
helpoff.gif
contactoff.gif
creditsoff.gif
homeoff.gif


The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2001 (July-December) » Three Small Questions.. « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alan Ó hAoire (crossroad.bloodservices.ca - 154.11.218.34)
Posted on Tuesday, May 22, 2001 - 11:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I apologize for being repetitive, I've just posted these questions on a previous topic, but in case that topic has been forgotten about I thought I'd try them as a fresh post.. They are very elementary in nature. As I've been studying Irish from all angles there are always various small points I am left wondering about...these are three of them..

* as in the english response to "how are you?"- "I'm not bad" or "I'm good" meaning similar things, is it proper in Irish to do the same- "Níl mé go dona" agus "Tá mé go maith" ? (also, what exactly does the "go" signify, I've found technical explanations, but I was hoping someone had a simple answer)

* is there a difference between "Tá mé" agus "Táim" ?

* In the phrase "go mbeirimid beo ar an am seo arís." what would the "mbeirimid" contribute. I have been unable to find it's translation except that "beir" would mean something along the lines of -giving birth- or -lay (egg)- and similar, I am confused as to what the -imid would add to that and how it would change its meaning.. would the literal translation of the entire thing be "may we give birth alive on time this again" (may we all be alive this time again)?

Buiochas,
Alan Ó hAoire

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Seosamh (1cust132.tnt30.nyc3.da.uu.net - 63.42.158.132)
Posted on Wednesday, May 23, 2001 - 01:59 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

*People say those phrases all the time, as well as many others. Normally, 'go' in front of an adjective turns it into an adverb (sort of like -ly in English). About eight adjectives also take 'go' when used predicatively with tá: Tá an leabhar go maith. The book is good. Tá sé scríofa go maith. It is written well. But, Is leabhar maith é. It's a good book.

Words in this category include: go maith (good), go dona (bad), go holc (bad, evil), go hálainn (beautiful), go haoibhinn (pleasant), go breá (fine), go deas (nice). (I think I'm forgetting one other.)

*Tá mé = táim. Irish has both the conjugated forms of verbs -- its inheritance from the mother IndoEuropean tongue -- and simplified, nonconjugated forms. The conjugated forms are most common in Munster Irish in the south but occur to some extent everywhere Irish is spoken.
Táimid or táimíd are the conjugated equivalents of tá muid ('we are'). Táimid, in fact, is the standard form.

*Beir also has the meaning of catch, grasp, take hold of. Usually in conjunction with the preposition ar: Beir ar an mála. Grab hold of the bag. Beir ar do chiall. Get a grip (on your sense). Have some sense. Breith beo ar dhuine. To catch someone alive. I think that that is the sense in 'Go mbeirimid beo ar an am seo arís.' May we live to see this time [next year]. (May we be found or caught alive this time next.)

Beir is irregular, has elusive meanings and a fair number of idioms. It's one of those verbs that deserves a study of its own, when you get a chance (when you've reached an intermediate level). Another one is 'gabh'. (Someone commented recently that 'Gabh' is one of those words that mean anything.)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Larry (host213-122-60-153.btinternet.com - 213.122.60.153)
Posted on Wednesday, May 23, 2001 - 02:35 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

... and "go hiontach" :-)

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Seosamh (c04-101.012.popsite.net - 64.24.44.101)
Posted on Wednesday, May 23, 2001 - 07:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

TY/Go raibh maith agat, a Larry. Go hiontach (wonderful) is the eighth adjective that regularly behaves this way.

Add Your Message Here
Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.


©Daltaí na Gaeilge