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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2001 (July-December) » Tir Na Nog « Previous Next »

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Sean (bg-tc-ppp1556.monmouth.com - 209.191.34.173)
Posted on Wednesday, March 28, 2001 - 06:20 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi

I was wondering if you could help. There is a horse farm in our town and the name is called Tir Na Nog, I asked what it meant and all they could tell me was "it is a mystical place in Ireland" but they were not sure ?

Not that I know a lot about Ireland, I was wonder if you have heard of this or could translate it meaning.

Thnaks for any information you can provide

Sean

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Colm Ó Dúill (tide131.microsoft.com - 207.46.36.10)
Posted on Thursday, March 29, 2001 - 05:14 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia Dhuit a Sheáin,
It should be Tír na nÓg. It means Land of the Young. This land features alot in Irish myth. The ledgend is those who live in it never grow old. However you cannot leave Tír na nÓg for if you do, you will turn to dust immediately. Or so goes the ledgend!
Tóg Bóg é,
Colm.

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Seán Brennan (cx421441-a.wwck1.ri.home.com - 65.11.252.160)
Posted on Friday, March 30, 2001 - 12:09 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Colm

Thank you very much for the translation, myth and the correct spelling. I will pass it on to the horse farm.

Seán

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Bríd (dialup-025.carlow.iol.ie - 194.125.46.217)
Posted on Wednesday, April 04, 2001 - 09:29 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Tír na nÓg was where óisín went with Niamh Chinn Óir(Naimh of the golden hair)They went from near Killarney across the sea on her white horse.They lived in great happiness but Óisín longed to visit his homeland.Niamh gave him the white horse so that he could once more visit Ireland with the warning not to dismount.When he returned to Ireland his friends were dead for many hundreds of years and the people seemed much smaller and weaker.He tried to hekp some men to move a stone but as he leaned from the saddle his girth snapped and he fell to the ground and straight away became an old old man.
B

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Dryad (ool-18bccf44.dyn.optonline.net - 24.188.207.68)
Posted on Friday, November 09, 2001 - 10:45 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

As a Folklorist (in training. Waiting for that PhD!) Tír na nÓg is also Faerie, or Faeryland, what have you. One never grows old there, and yes, if you leave, you discover how long you've been away from Earth (usually hundreds of years)and turn to dust. It's believed the original settlers of Eíre were forced beneath ground and thus Tír na nÓg was created. Other theories of Faeries are that they are the unbaptisted children of Christians who are not bad enough for hell, but cannot enter Heaven, and also the angels who 'sat on the fence' during the fight between G-d and Lucifer. This believe didn't make an appearance until after Ireland was Christianized. Now that I've babbled enough to earn my PhD, I'll be quiet now. :)

--Sarah

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Khaetlynne (216-171-196-16.dpe.net - 216.171.196.16)
Posted on Saturday, December 01, 2001 - 01:03 am:   Edit Post Print Post

The story of Tír na nÓg that I learned was that it was a land promised to the Faerie folk, or the Picts, as some have called them now, by Father Lugh (worshipped in his form of the sun). Myth has been mixed with fact so much that I can't be sure what time period these people were actually from, but I'm still a novice so I haven't had time to learn enough to be sure. Land of the Young is the best description. A land of plenty, of health and wealth, happiness and youth.

I read a book by Parke Godwin, called "The Last Rainbow" that told of St. Patrick and the Faerie-folk, or Prydn as they called themselves, and their quest for Tír na nÓg as the British and Romans pushed civilization farther into the hills and the land left to the Prydn shrunk and shrunk.

It seems to be a common theme in elven-like stories..the mystical creatures of an era ending that had age old roots and a deep connection to the earth itself being forced to retreat farther and farther into the corners of the land where the new era man would not go, and then, usually, either finding this Tír na nÓg where they could live forever away from the 'new era man', or being wiped out of existance completely.

(Its also mentioned in the well known movie 'Titanic' when the ship is going down, and a mother is lying there with her two children, telling them a story to take their minds off of their deaths and it ends something like "and they lived happily ever after in the promised land of Tír na nÓg.." It's been awhile since I've watched that, so I don't think that's exactly it, but oh well.)

That's my two cents worth, and it may not have helped, but I thought I'd contribute anyways. :)

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Khaetlynne again (216-171-196-16.dpe.net - 216.171.196.16)
Posted on Saturday, December 01, 2001 - 01:07 am:   Edit Post Print Post

(oops.. guess i wasnt done!)

I think that in some ways Tír na nÓg is like the Fields of Greek myth that the good, noble and honest were sent to after their death.. a land of green growth, sunshine, good weather, happiness, health, youth, plenty and all that... I think my point is gotten.

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