mainoff.gif
lastdyoff.gif
lastwkoff.gif
treeoff.gif
searchoff.gif
helpoff.gif
contactoff.gif
creditsoff.gif
homeoff.gif


The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2001 (January-June) » Days of the week and the months of the year « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Frank (bg-tc-ppp1471.monmouth.com - 209.191.17.86)
Posted on Monday, November 20, 2000 - 04:44 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hello,
I was checking out your site and I was wondering if you could send me back,by email,the correct spellings of the days of the week and the months of the year in Irish Gaelic.I'm fairly sure I know them,but I want to be sure my spelling is correct,
Go Raibh Maith Agat!
Frank

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

tccarlton (lebo39.osprey.net - 206.252.174.169)
Posted on Tuesday, November 21, 2000 - 12:45 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia duit,
I was wondering the same thing. When someone sends the days of the week and the months to Frank, le do thoil send them to me too. go raibh maith agat and Dia linn.

Charity

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (vpn.parthus.com - 62.221.5.1)
Posted on Tuesday, November 21, 2000 - 04:13 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Since Frank forgot to include his e-mail address, I'll post them here:
Dé Luain Monday
Dé Máirt Tuesday
Céadaoin Wednesday
Deardaoin Thursday
Aoine Friday
Satharn Saturday
Domhnach Sunday

Eanáir January
Feabhra February
Márta March
Aibréan April
Bealtaine May
Meitheamh June
Iúil July
Lúnasa August
Meán Fómhair September
Deireadh Fómhair October
Samhain November
Nollaig December

beir bua
Aonghus

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Laighneach (oak.may.ie - 149.157.1.55)
Posted on Tuesday, November 21, 2000 - 09:52 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Why do you omit the prefix "Dé", a Aonghuis, for five of the days?Shouldn't it be:

Dé Luain
Dé Máirt
Dé Chéadaoin
Dé Déardaoin
Dé hAoine
Dé Sathairn
Dé Domhnaigh

"Dé" being the old irish word for "Day" funnily enough!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (vpn.parthus.com - 62.221.5.1)
Posted on Tuesday, November 21, 2000 - 10:27 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Because that is how I would normally use the names of the days, I only use Dé with Luain and Máirt!

But you can of course use Dé with all of them.

Dé was only used for the day's of the week, I have seen it spelt dia in older books. I'm fairly sure lá was used in all other contexts.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Colm (194.165.165.122)
Posted on Tuesday, November 21, 2000 - 02:07 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Helló,
Sorry, just to correct Laighneach. There is no such thing as Dé Déardaoin, it's just Déardaoin on it's own,
Tóg Bóg é,
Colm.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Laighneach (oak.may.ie - 149.157.1.55)
Posted on Wednesday, November 22, 2000 - 05:09 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Are you sure Colm? Although I'm not sure enough to contradict you.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Antóin (p560.as1.cork1.eircom.net - 159.134.218.48)
Posted on Wednesday, November 22, 2000 - 07:35 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Yes. Tá an ceart ag Colm. I would imagine that the "Dé" has been grafted on to Déardaoin in the past.

Slán - Antóin

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (vpn.parthus.com - 62.221.5.1)
Posted on Wednesday, November 22, 2000 - 10:30 am:   Edit Post Print Post

In the early celtic Church, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday were fast days. (Aoine)

So we have the first fast day (Céadaoin), the second fast day (Déardaoin) and the main fast day (Aoine).

Otherwise the names of the days follow the pattern of roman names Luain (after the Moon), Máirt (Mars, who becomes his Nordic version Tyr or Tiu in English), Satharn (Saturn) and Domhnach coming from Dominus, the Lord.

Today's pieces of useless information.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Seosamh (3cust234.tnt11.nyc3.da.uu.net - 63.23.135.234)
Posted on Wednesday, November 22, 2000 - 11:30 am:   Edit Post Print Post

But it's today's most interesting information. And the stuff that Who Wants to Be a Millionaire fortunes are made of.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kay (dialup-0325.dublin.iol.ie - 193.203.145.69)
Posted on Thursday, November 23, 2000 - 03:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Now, the story I heard, was that Dé Céadaoin was the day of first fast and Dé hAoine was the day of fast and Déardaoin comes from "Dé idir dhá aoin" meaning the day between the two fasts.

For sound files and more details see
http://www.iol.ie/~sefton/feilire.html


Lá na hAltaithe faoi shonas daoibh go léir! which translated means:
Happy Thanksgiving to you all!

Kay.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Laighneach (oak.may.ie - 149.157.1.55)
Posted on Sunday, November 26, 2000 - 11:55 am:   Edit Post Print Post

'Sea, déanann an méid sin ciall domsa, a chairde.Foghlaimím rud nua gach lá.Go raibh maith agaibh!

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aonghus (vpn.parthus.com - 62.221.5.1)
Posted on Monday, November 27, 2000 - 03:53 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dearfhainn go bhfuil an ceart iomlán ag Kay.
Níl aon foinse agam chun deimhin a dhéanamh dé, ach ta cruth na firinne air.

On reflection, I agree with Kay about Déardaoin.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alan Shepherd (proxy.bloodservices.ca - 154.11.218.34)
Posted on Friday, February 23, 2001 - 07:49 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia Daoibh,
I was just reading back on past topics and this interested me quite a bit. For some reason I've learned An Luan as "Monday", and Dé Luain as "on monday", I'm now assuming I've been wrong all along, but I'm interested to know if An Luan (etc for rest of days) has a seperate meaning.

Buoichas,
Alan Shepherd

Add Your Message Here
Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.


©Daltaí na Gaeilge