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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2000 (July-December) » A few quick grammar questions... « Previous Next »

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Antaine (bg-tc-ppp1052.monmouth.com - 209.191.51.240)
Posted on Monday, October 09, 2000 - 12:46 am:   Edit Post Print Post

hi there. I had a few quick questions...

when do you use "atá" instead of "tá"?

when do you use "sna" instead of "sa"?

what does "go bhfuil" mean?

when do you put "is" (Is dalta mé) at the beginning of a sentence instead of "tá" (tá mé go maith)?

exactly under what circumstances do you use a prepositional pronoun with a noun (Tá ocras ort) instead of an adjective (tá mé go maith)?

Is one still easily understood by using the pronouns in all instances and for all pronouns (d'abair mé instead of d'abairím, also with muid and siad)?

Is one still easily understood if they choose to use sinn instead of muid (or -imid)?

how would you say "why aren't you in the class today?" would it be Cén fath nach bhfuil tú sa rang inniu? or "Cén fath níl tú sa rang inniu?" or something else entirely?

go raibh míle maith agat,
Antaine

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Seosamh (1cust95.tnt9.nyc3.da.uu.net - 63.23.128.95)
Posted on Monday, October 09, 2000 - 01:48 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

"Atá" is a relative form of "tá": "that,which is": An duine atá i gceanas anseo. The person who is in charge here. Conas atá tú? How is it that you are?

"Sna" is used before plural nouns, "sa" before singular: sa teach, sna tithe. In the house, in the houses.

"Go bhfuil" mean "that is": Deir sé go bhfuil sé gnóthach. He says that he is busy. Sílim go bhfuil Seán tinn inniu. I think Seán is sick today. "Go" is a conjunction used most often with reported speech and thoughts. "Bhfuil" is the dependent form of tá, used in in questions, negative statements and many relative constructions.

Re. Is vs. tá: It's basically like ser and estar in Spanish. Most languages make a distinction between equivalence or classification on the one hand and states of being and location on the other: Tá Seán tinn. Tá sé i gConamara. Is dochtúir é. He is a doctor. A cardinal sin of Irish would be to say *Tá sé dochtúir.

Use sinn with "is" and muid (Connaught)or -imid (Munster) with tá and other verbs. (In Ulster they tend to use sinn with other verbs too.)

Your first choice for "why aren't you in class today" is the correct one. That's enough for now. You're an eager learner. Ádh mór ort. Best of luck.

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antaine (spider-ti033.proxy.aol.com - 152.163.194.188)
Posted on Monday, October 09, 2000 - 02:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

go raibh m’le maith agat, a Sheosaimh.

le bu’ochas,
Antaine

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