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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2000 (July-December) » Four Elements, Zodiac Signs-in Gaelic « Previous Next »

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Susan (slip129-37-237-65.il.us.prserv.net - 129.37.237.65)
Posted on Monday, September 25, 2000 - 07:10 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I am looking for the following information:

1. How does one say the names of the four elements -- earth, air, water, and fire -- in Irish Gaelic? If possible, I also need the pronunciation (phonetically), indicating which syllable is accented (for words of more than one syllable).

2. What are the Gaelic words for the 12 signs of the zodiac (Aries, Taurus, Gemini, Cancer, Leo, Virgo, Libra, Scorpio, Sagittarius, Capricorn, Aquarius, and Pisces)? Again, I would also need a pronunciation/accent guide.

I appreciate any help anyone is willing to provide! Thank you very much.

Susan

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Seosamh (1cust251.tnt12.nyc3.da.uu.net - 63.23.136.251)
Posted on Monday, September 25, 2000 - 11:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

earth, cré (kray, somewhat as in 'crayfish')
air, aer (ayr)
water, uisce (ISH-kuh)
fire, tine (CHIN-uh)

Aquarius, an tUisceadóir (UHN TISH-kuh-doar)
Pisces, an tIasc (CHEE-uhsk)
Aries, an Reithe (REH-huh)
Taurus, an Tarbh (TAHR-uv or TAHR-oo)
Gemini, an Cúpla (KOOP-luh or KUP-luh)
Cancer, an Portán (POR-tahn)
Leo, an Leon (LYOAHN)
Virgo, an Mhaighdean (WAH-djuhn)
Libra, an Mheá (vyaw)
Scorpio, an Scairp (skarp)
Sagittarius, an Saighdeoir (SIGH-djoar)
Capricorn, an Gabhar (GOW-uhr)

'An' means 'the': an Gabhar, the Goat. The pronunciation is approximate and meant for some one with American English who doesn't know the International Phonetic Alphabet. 'Uh' is the vowel sound in the word 'the'.

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Susan (slip129-37-237-50.il.us.prserv.net - 129.37.237.50)
Posted on Tuesday, September 26, 2000 - 09:19 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Question: talamh vs cre.

Thank you very much for replying so quickly! In my wanderings on the net and otherwise, I came across the word "talamh" for earth (ground, land). Is "cre" the same thing or does it mean the planet earth or something similar? Since we use the same word ("earth") in English, I thought I'd better check. Thanks again!

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An Beirneach (212.250.188.215)
Posted on Tuesday, September 26, 2000 - 12:33 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

As far as I know "cre" is used for soil. There is a well known comic novel in Irish called 'Cré na Cille' by Máirtín O Cadhain about the conversation and actions of the dead in a graveyard, I think it has been made into a drame as well. Anyhow back to your questions - I hope this answer helps you out. Slán!
An Beirneach.

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Seosamh (3cust79.tnt11.nyc3.da.uu.net - 63.23.135.79)
Posted on Tuesday, September 26, 2000 - 12:44 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

'Talamh' means land, ground, country. It can also mean soil or earth, but as the Dinneen Dictionary adds "in limited sense". 'Cré' means clay, soil, earth, dust' and is the word most often chosen by Irish speakers for earth or soil. There's also 'ithir' and 'úir'.

I chose 'cré' over 'talamh'. Maybe others here have a different opinion. 'Úir' might do too, but it's used so often to mean the grave that I would pass up on it. 'Go dté mé san úir' people say: Until I am dead and gone.

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Seosamh (3cust79.tnt11.nyc3.da.uu.net - 63.23.135.79)
Posted on Tuesday, September 26, 2000 - 12:48 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Gabh mo leithscéal, a Bheirnigh. Bhí muid ag scríobh ár dteachtaireachtaí ag an am céanna.

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