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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2001 (January-June) » An in-depth course in learning Irish « Previous Next »

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Denise-Mary Pope (bg-tc-ppp38.monmouth.com - 209.191.60.39)
Posted on Monday, August 14, 2000 - 06:31 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I have printed off your order form to order a few tapes. However, what I am really looking for is an in-depth course in learning Irish -- the kind of course, or the same type of material, that might cover, say, an entire college semester. Do you know of any source for such an in-depth course of study? I don't just want to learn some phrases to "get by." Rather, I 'd like (over the course of time) to read books in Irish. Thank you for any info you can provide.

Regards, Denise-Mary Pope

P.S. I have come across the name "Fionnagh" time and again in my reading of Irish literature and would love to know the correct pronunciation. I have been pronouncing it "Fee-oh'-nah" but I'm thinking "Finn'-ah" is more accurate?

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Seosamh (1cust227.tnt20.nyc3.da.uu.net - 63.38.34.227)
Posted on Monday, August 14, 2000 - 11:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

_Learning Irish: An Introductory Self-Tutor_ by Mícheál Ó Siadhail is the most solid introduction to the language. It is based on a specific dialect of Irish, that of the Connemara coastal area called Cois Fhairrge. So the spelling is a bit 'off' from what you will normally see in Irish books, newspapers, etc. Also, if you have (or later develop) a desire to learn another dialect, you'll have to do a fair bit of weeding out of what you have already learned. It comes with tapes and is published in the US from Yale Univ. Press. Be careful ordering. The book and tapes are sold separately but I've heard that Yale has just come out with a combined package that is cheaper.

The new edition of _Teach Yourself Irish_ is the equivalent of a college course, but a much less demanding one. It will leave you a bit short of your goal. But then you can supplement it as you progress with grammar and other books. The Irish in it seems fairly standard with an attempt to develop some feel for the dialects. I haven't heard the tapes but I have heard criticism of them. I'm sure the course is serviceable. The old _TY Irish_ is a classic of Munster (southern) Irish, rural in orientation, but thorough. It's out of print, but you might find a copy.

_Irish on Your Own_ has Ulster (northern) Irish and is heavily conversational, with tapes. You would want to supplement it with a grammar book. Routlege will be coming out with a book and tapes, probably Ulster Irish, in their Colloquial series.

I heard that Alan Titley, a prominent Irish language writer, is coming out with a text for learners. It would probably be Munster Irish, and I bet it will both be thorough and be done with a sense of humor. If this is true and you want Munster, I wouldn't hesitate to start with less ideal materials until it is available.

Besides Borders, B & N, Amazon, you can order from Irish Books & Media in Minn, MN (800-229-3505 or try their website: www.irishbooks.com ?) They'll be more knowledgeable.

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Denise-Mary Pope (host206-159-12-50.wia.com - 206.159.12.50)
Posted on Tuesday, August 15, 2000 - 11:48 am:   Edit Post Print Post

It was very kind of you to take the time to reply. Thank you so much for the suggestions.

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Seosamh (1cust46.tnt9.nyc3.da.uu.net - 63.23.128.46)
Posted on Wednesday, August 23, 2000 - 03:06 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

There's no forthcoming textbook from Alan Titley. It was a Gaelgeoir rumor that seems to have originated from the book on the Celts that he recently had published. (Dúirt bean liom gur chuala sí ó fhear go raibh a leithéid ag teacht amach ach deir sí anois nach bhuil aon bhunús leis sin.)

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Dennis King (proxy1-external.sttln1.wa.home.com - 24.4.254.154)
Posted on Wednesday, August 23, 2000 - 09:10 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Gabriel Rosenstock, another one of our literary lights, did write a book called _Beginner's Irish_ which came out this year. Fairly routine stuff, not particularly inspired, IMO. Níl sé go dona, ach tá a chuid leabhartha i nGaeilge níos fearr.

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Seosamh (3cust181.tnt12.nyc3.da.uu.net - 63.23.138.181)
Posted on Wednesday, August 23, 2000 - 11:21 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Arna fhoilsiú ag mo chairde ag Hippocrene i Nua Eabhrac. Chuir Gabriel leabhar fhilíocht an ghrá in eagar dóibh agus ba ansin, is dócha, a d'iarr siad air leabhar sa tsraith 'Beginner's' a scríobh dóibh. 'S é an leagan amach atá iontu ná deich gceacht a chuireas buntús teanga éigin don fhoghlaimeoir. Cé nach mbíonn iontu ach tús agus go mbíonn an ghramadach cineál gann, bíonn na comhráití comhaimseartha agus toirt de shaghas iontu ach deacair don ghlantosnaitheoir.

Ina réamhrá, deir údar an cheann Spáinnise a ndúirt ollamh Spáinnise léise ag tús báire: Bíonn foghlaim teanga cosúil le clábar a chaitheamh le balla. Fanfaidh cuid di ar an bhalla, agus ní an chuid eile. De réir a chéile, cuirtear leis an chlábar ar an bhalla.

Tá a lán teangacha sa tsraith Beginner's acu ón tSínis go dtí an tSicilis. Leanann na cinn is fearr an patrún sin acu ach seachain. Athchló atá i gceann amháin, ar an laghad, díobh -- an ceann Maori. Tá an tsraith "Mastering" sách maith agus neamhchostasach, téipeanna san áireamh. Níl an Ghaeilge ann, áfach.

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williamfuller (1cust12.tnt1.ruston.la.da.uu.net - 63.11.21.12)
Posted on Friday, August 25, 2000 - 11:21 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A chairde: a 1976 printing og TYI was the first book for my home study.Considerable inflection of its Irish is challenging. Quite oftn, the Bearla had very thorough explanation of difficult points of grammar. ...Slan!

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Seosamh (1cust5.tnt12.nyc3.da.uu.net - 63.23.136.5)
Posted on Friday, August 25, 2000 - 09:31 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

It's a great book, but to begin with? The intro. And first few lessons are an awful lot for a beginner to digest. I would suggest that someone who wants to learn Munster Irish get their feet wet elsewhere. If someone is very lucky they'll not only scare up a copy of the book but the records/tapes (?) as well.

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Susan Sullivan Sylvester (webet.dsrnet.com - 208.203.147.25)
Posted on Tuesday, May 15, 2001 - 12:15 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I'm still trying to determine which area of Ireland my ancestors are from. How do you determine which dialect to learn if you aren't familiar with any of them in particular?

Also, Susan Lorraine Sullivan is my "american" name. Any ideas on the Irish equivalent?

thanks,

Susan

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Alan Ó hAoire (ts7-27.odyssey.on.ca - 209.213.229.177)
Posted on Monday, May 21, 2001 - 09:57 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Two of my Greatgrandfolk on my mothers side had come from Ireland over to Canada, my Greatgran was a Sullivan and Greatgranddad was a Shannon. I know my Greatgran came from Cork, but as my grandmother suffers from alzheimers I am unsure what town (and my mum has no clue). Last time I was over I was looking around for info but could find little. I was told that Sullivan is a very strong name in Cork, and it sure seemed that way from the number of times I saw it there, if your family moved over a long time ago there might be a strong chance some of your roots might have been in that soil. In that case you might want to concentrate on the Munster dialect at first. I was lucky in that respect as the Irish teacher in my city is from Cork, Mr. Mike Murphy, (in case he happens to be reading this) a brilliant instructor.

Alan

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