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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2002 (July-December) » need a translation ... please... « Previous Next »

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cait boyle
Posted on Thursday, August 03, 2000 - 11:15 am:   Edit Post Print Post

could anyone translate "Master of light" or "Master of my light"

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Laigheanach (ts15-164.dublin.indigo.ie - 194.125.176.164)
Posted on Friday, August 04, 2000 - 01:15 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

"Máistir an tSolais" and
"Máistir mo Sholais"

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Betty (n1-21-208.dhcp.drexel.edu - 129.25.21.208)
Posted on Wednesday, December 06, 2000 - 10:23 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Could you please tell me what these words are and what they mean ??

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betty (n1-21-208.dhcp.drexel.edu - 129.25.21.208)
Posted on Wednesday, December 06, 2000 - 10:24 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

"Derevaun Seraun!

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Dennis (c792392-a.sttln1.wa.home.com - 24.19.205.18)
Posted on Thursday, December 07, 2000 - 01:29 am:   Edit Post Print Post

It means: "If one more person gets into this elevator, even a little skinny slip of a thing like you, the local density will exceed 2 3/4 "rev", which will provoke an "au" singularity, bringing the long-awaited messiah into neon-back-lit corporality. But since the noösphere is not yet buff enough to hang with that dude, the fairies who run all our worldly infrastructure will prevent your entry into said packed elevator by squirting a powerful whiff of "erau", which the unsophisticated are apt to mistake for fried onion fart. Please step back and await the next car. The triple world thanks you for your patience!" Agus an chéad cheist eile?

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Seosamh (1cust231.tnt11.nyc3.da.uu.net - 63.23.134.231)
Posted on Thursday, December 07, 2000 - 12:45 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Agus bhí mé ag rá go raibh an Laighneach imithe thar fóir:-)

I once encountered a Joyce buff who talked like that when sauced. It was frightening though, not funny. It WAS Joyce who came up with 'Derevaun Seraun', wasn't it, Betty? Somewhere in _Dubliners_.

I think Joyce concocted it out of thin air, either to underscore the fact that Irish was incomprehensible to his character or to mock the language that he denied knowing. (A friend who reads up on Joyce says that the writer studied it for a couple of years with Fr. Dinneen.)

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Sandy Wilson (port6usr.rkymtnhi.com - 204.131.47.136)
Posted on Thursday, August 23, 2001 - 11:14 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

We recently attended a family reunion in Adare Ireland and I would love to know how to write-"Where spirit meets mountain" in gaelic. Can anyone help me?

Sandy
Spirit Mt. Ranch
Colorado
spiritmtn@rkymtnhi.com

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whatsthematter3@aol.com (spider-tm064.proxy.aol.com - 152.163.197.74)
Posted on Friday, November 16, 2001 - 02:52 am:   Edit Post Print Post

My grandmother always taught us when entering a home, pub, etc. to always say "GOD BLESS ALL HERE". Can anyone please assist me with the correct Irish Gaelic translation. Thank you.

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Dennis King (c792392-a.sttln1.wa.home.com - 24.19.205.18)
Posted on Friday, November 16, 2001 - 02:35 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

The easiest phrase commonly used with this meaning is

Dia sa teach!

There are other variants, like "Dia anseo isteach".

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Liam og (1cust34.tnt1.cleveland.oh.da.uu.net - 65.238.21.34)
Posted on Saturday, August 31, 2002 - 01:48 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Can any one help with a translation of the following


Honored father
always loved
never forgotten

We want to use it as a memorial for my father who recentky passed away

Thank you in advance

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Ó Dúill (p205.as1.qkr.cork1.eircom.net - 159.134.180.205)
Posted on Sunday, September 01, 2002 - 04:15 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Honoured Father = Áthair Clúiteach

Always loved and never forgotten are hard to translate but I offer these suggestions:

Always in our hearts = In ár gcroíthe i gconaí
For ever in our hearts = In ár gcroíthe go brách

We will not forget you ever = Ní dhéanfaimid tú go deo.

Hope this has been of some help,
le meas, yours,
Colm.

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Ó Dúill (p293.as1.qkr.cork1.eircom.net - 159.134.181.37)
Posted on Sunday, September 08, 2002 - 07:35 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Coming back to add to the translation i found i had omitted something in the last sentance.

We will not forget you = Ní dhéanfaimid dearmad díot go deo.

Also: Unforgettable = dodhearmadta
And : Impossible to forget = dodhéanta a dhéantar dearmad

All the best,
Colm.

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Aibinn hui Neill (198.107.42.194)
Posted on Monday, September 09, 2002 - 01:10 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Could someone help me translate the following phrase into Irish (even better, into Middle Irish). Thanks for any help:

Wishing you blessings and good dreams.

Thank you again,
Aibinn

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Seathrún (dsl-65-184-214-2.telocity.com - 65.184.214.2)
Posted on Tuesday, September 17, 2002 - 01:04 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Can anyone tell me in English the meaning of this lovely phrase:

"so dorn dona dubfuillib"

Thank you.

Seathrún Mac Mathghamnha

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James (wcs1.norfolk.nipr.mil - 198.26.132.101)
Posted on Tuesday, September 17, 2002 - 01:45 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

so with a fada (só) would be ease or luxury and used as a prefix it denotes easy or with ease.

Dorn = fist or punch

Dona = bad or wretched

Dubh = black or dark or evil deed

fuil = blood but in a variety of senses such as blood relative, actual blood itself, blood as in temperament...lot's of different "blood" connotations.

The suffix "ib" doesn't seem "irish" to me. My guess is you've lost the "h" at the end or some combination of letters that preceed it.

Check your spellings (don't forget the fadas!!!) and let me get another stab at it. One letter (or fada) can make all the difference as I recently discovered ie; gaobhar = nearness gabhar = goat. See the Amhrán Mhuinse posting to completely understand the impact!


Also, if you could put it in a broader context (is it part of a sentence, a family motto....???) that would be helpful.

Le meas,

James

I'm just a beginner so some of the native speakers or more accomplished students may pick up on this straight away.

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Seathrún (dsl-65-184-214-2.telocity.com - 65.184.214.2)
Posted on Thursday, September 19, 2002 - 12:22 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you, James, for that reply. It is from a family motto, and may be in an archaic form of the language. There are no fadas shown over the vowels. There are, however, marks above the d and the b's in "dubfuillib."

If you would like to see the motto in context, you can find it here:

homepage.mac.com/jmcmahon/.Pictures/mcmahon-oriel.jpg

Go raibh maith agat,
Jeff McMahon

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