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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2000 (January-June) » Thank God I Found You « Previous Next »

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Jiayuan (bg-tc-ppp928.monmouth.com - 209.191.51.114)
Posted on Thursday, May 18, 2000 - 12:35 am:   Edit Post Print Post

hello. i would like to ask you a favour of helping me translate 'Thank God I Found You' to gaelic language. thank you very much.

love,
Jiayuan

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Jiayuan (nova.singnet.com.sg - 165.21.83.161)
Posted on Thursday, May 18, 2000 - 07:01 am:   Edit Post Print Post

my e-mail address is the_adopted@yahoo.com
it would be really great if you guys could send me the gaelic translation of Thank God I Found You.

thank you
love,
Jiayuan

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Dennis King (proxy1-external.sttln1.wa.home.com - 24.4.254.154)
Posted on Thursday, May 18, 2000 - 02:41 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Fuair mé thú, buíochas le Dia.

That's the most straightforward, simple translation, I think.

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Aonghus (gw.sslinc.com - 193.120.168.40)
Posted on Friday, May 19, 2000 - 03:55 am:   Edit Post Print Post

But doesn't quite carry the same emphasis as the english.
I would tend to translate it as
"Gabhaim buíochas le Dia go bhfuair mé thú"
since you are specifically thanking God for finding the person, whereas in Dennis' version, buíochas le Dia is just an aspiration, thanking God in general.

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Jiayuan (nova.singnet.com.sg - 165.21.83.161)
Posted on Friday, May 19, 2000 - 05:33 am:   Edit Post Print Post

wow... so now i have three choices... someone i asked told me that it was ' conas a ta tu ' then dennis king said that it's ' Fuair mé thú, buíochas le Dia ' then aonglus said that it's
'Gabhaim buíochas le Dia go bhfuair mé thú ' so which one should i use.. you seee.. my friend and i want to have Thank God I Found You inscribed on our rings. so we thought that Gaelic is cool. so we want Thank God I Found You to be inscribed on the ring. anyway... thanks alot of the help.

love, Jiayuan

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Aonghus (gw.sslinc.com - 193.120.168.40)
Posted on Friday, May 19, 2000 - 07:29 am:   Edit Post Print Post

conas atá tú just means how are you.
The difference between Dennis' version and mine is just one of emphasis

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An Creabhar (moby.netacc.net - 208.153.34.42)
Posted on Friday, May 19, 2000 - 09:27 am:   Edit Post Print Post

As a neutral third party I'll take Aonghus out of his dilemma and say that 'Gabhaim buíochas le Dia go bhfuair mé thú ' would be a stronger Irish idiom and my preferred one for your purpose.

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Jiayuan (planet.zapsurf.com.sg - 203.124.1.185)
Posted on Friday, May 19, 2000 - 11:50 am:   Edit Post Print Post

but it's sooooo long.. how am i going to squeeze everything into that tiny little ring?but never mind..i shall try... thanks alot of all your help... thank you and have a nice day! bye bye and God bless! =)

love, Jiayuan

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Dennis King (proxy1-external.sttln1.wa.home.com - 24.4.254.154)
Posted on Friday, May 19, 2000 - 01:35 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I agree that "Gabhaim buíochas le Dia go bhfuair mé thú." is a more heartfelt way of expressing it. But it is long for an inscription on a ring. So I'm putting out a somewhat more compact version for inspection: Fuair mé thú a bhuí le Dia. What do you think, guys?

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Laigheanach (ts16-203.dublin.indigo.ie - 194.125.177.203)
Posted on Friday, May 19, 2000 - 01:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Just a thought-
Do you mean "thank god I discovered you" or "thank god i found you, after losing you".The conText can affect it in this way.

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Dennis King (proxy1-external.sttln1.wa.home.com - 24.4.254.154)
Posted on Friday, May 19, 2000 - 02:38 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Right. In the first instance, one might say "Casadh orm thú" (= "I met you" but with an implication of chance: "I happened to meet you.") Táim buíoch gur casadh orm thú. (= I'm grateful that I met you.) "Casadh orm thú a bhuí le Dia." (= It so happened that I met you, thanks be to God.) But then, "meeting" doesn't imply "possessing", which "fuair" does: found, discovered, got, obtained, gained. Next?

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Jiayuan (milkyway.singnet.com.sg - 165.21.83.156)
Posted on Friday, May 19, 2000 - 11:31 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Fuair mé thú a bhuí le Dia
but does that have the same meaning of Thank God I Found You in a ' i thank god that i found you, my very good friend ' way?

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Laigheanach (ts15-022.dublin.indigo.ie - 194.125.176.22)
Posted on Saturday, May 20, 2000 - 07:13 am:   Edit Post Print Post

If it's a friend that you made, I think you should say
"A bhuí le Dia gur aimsigh mé thú"
"Thank God I discovered you"(You know, like they're some kind of treasure)

"A bhuí le Dia" looks like a good way of saying thanks in that conText.

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Jiayuan (milkyway.singnet.com.sg - 165.21.83.156)
Posted on Saturday, May 20, 2000 - 09:03 am:   Edit Post Print Post

hmmm... ok... so now it's between 'A bhuí le Dia gur aimsigh mé thú' and 'Fuair mé thú a bhuí le Dia'

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