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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2000 (January-June) » Translation of 2 words for an art project « Previous Next »

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Wilfried Pieters
Posted on Sunday, May 07, 2000 - 05:57 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi!
For an art project of the Museum of Contemporary Art in Ghent we are looking for the translation of two words into Irish:
- COUSINAGE (meaning "the state of being cousins")
- MIRRORING (= reflection, as from a mirror)
What exactly the artist intends to do with these words is still unknown. Besides Irish she wants the same words in 86 other languages from the world. I'll keep you informed how the words will be used.
Thank you for all suggestions!
Wilfried Pieters
wilfried.pieters@euronet.be

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Dennis King (proxy1-external.sttln1.wa.home.com - 24.4.254.154)
Posted on Sunday, May 07, 2000 - 09:44 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

scáthántacht = what a mirror (scáthán) does, reflecting, reflection
scáil = reflection (but also = shade, shadow, image)

Quant à 'cousinage', ce mot existe-t-il encore en français (ou en flamand)? Je crois que c'est caduc en anglais. Je dirais 'cousinship' peut-être. En irlandais, c'est dificile. We have 'col ceathar' (or 'ceathrair' or 'ceathrar' as alternative forms), which specifically means 'first cousin (male or female)', and literally means 'fourth degree of consanguinity'. But I have no idea how to express the general concept of 'cousinship' in a word, other than the too general 'gaol (fola)' = '(blood) relationship'.

Barúil ag éinne eile?

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Seosamh (1cust6.tnt9.nyc3.da.uu.net - 63.23.128.6)
Posted on Monday, May 08, 2000 - 12:39 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Muintireas? Gaol coil? 'Gaol', 'col' and 'muintir' all have multiple meanings and associations*. The idea of cousinage as used above, I assume, is not so much literally being cousins as being closely related, having a close affinity. What about 'gaolacht', which Dineen translates as 'the friendship of relatives'?

* Ó Dónaill starts with col by defining it as a 'prohibition, impediment (to marraige)'. By the time he is finished with it, we have 'Chuir an bia col orm, the food revolted me.' (An 'désinvolte' an focal a bhainfeadh Frainciseoir a bhfuil foclóir mór agus ciall bheag aige/aici as 'col'? :-)

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Seosamh (1cust6.tnt9.nyc3.da.uu.net - 63.23.128.6)
Posted on Monday, May 08, 2000 - 12:41 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Marriage. Oops!

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Dennis King (proxy1-external.sttln1.wa.home.com - 24.4.254.154)
Posted on Monday, May 08, 2000 - 01:11 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Also:

col fola = consanguinity

na colanna = the degrees of relationship

Ach Frainciseoir atá gann i gciall? Quelle bêtise! C'est impossible!

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Seosamh
Posted on Monday, May 08, 2000 - 05:22 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Ca c'est la raison que j'ai utilisé le conditionnel, mon amis: çe n'était pas q'une supposition. Comme nous avons tous appris dans la chanson 'Peigín is Peadar': Ach Francach gan chéill, ní fhaca mé riamh.' :-)

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Dennis King (c792392-a.sttln1.wa.home.com - 24.19.205.18)
Posted on Monday, May 08, 2000 - 10:39 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Ná bí dána!! Ach caithfidh mé admháil nár chuala mé an t-amhrán sin riamh. An mbeadh an t-am agat rann nó dhó de a bhreacadh síos anseo?

Dennis King - Stair an Fhocail: sniodh
http://members.home.net/donncha1/stair3.html

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