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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (January-June) » Translation help please! « Previous Next »

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Seamus
Posted on Sunday, April 23, 2000 - 12:59 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Greetings,
I'm looking for a translation of a short phrase, "In all things, in all ways, for all time." In case the conText is necessary, it would be like saying, "I am Irish in all things, in all ways, for all time." Can anyone help?
-Seamus (Rrelion@Yahoo.com)

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (lillisolaoire.staff2.ul.ie - 136.201.142.4)
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2000 - 04:06 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I ngach rud,
in achan slí,
go hearr an ama.

agus :

in achan rud,
ar chuile bhealach,
go broinn an bhrátha.

Sásúil?

I ngach rud is ar chuile bhealach go hearr an ama.

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Betty (n1-21-208.dhcp.drexel.edu - 129.25.21.208)
Posted on Wednesday, December 06, 2000 - 10:28 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

can anyone help me

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Selina Casali (195.65.159.11)
Posted on Monday, March 26, 2001 - 07:57 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hello,
I am desperately trying to get a translation of a message a friend of mine left me :

"Go raibh mile maith agat mar bhí alán craic againn í na cuig seachtaine. Is duine go hailinn túsa agus tá suile agan go feicidh mé túsa an t-am eile. Go neiridh leat ar an bhóthair."

Thank you very much in advance for helping me.
Kind regards,
Selina

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Aonghus (vpn.parthus.com - 62.221.5.1)
Posted on Monday, March 26, 2001 - 09:36 am:   Edit Post Print Post

This translates as
"Thank you very much, because we had a lot of fun during the five weeks. You are a beautiful person, and I hope I will see you again. Good luck"

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Kaye (delta-27.sisna.com - 216.126.211.155)
Posted on Wednesday, April 04, 2001 - 04:29 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

This is from Kaye. Can you translate these to Gaelic? "Keys that unlock thoughts" and "doors through which truth is known" From {Kayes@hubwest.com

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Aonghus (vpn.parthus.com - 62.221.5.1)
Posted on Thursday, April 05, 2001 - 03:53 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Eocharacha smaointe = thought keys
Doirse firinne = Truth doors

Your English versions seem to me to be cumbersome, and a word for word translation would be fairly awful. But the above conveys the concept.

beir bua
Aonghus

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Amanda (proxy-1431.public.svc.webtv.net - 209.240.220.228)
Posted on Tuesday, July 17, 2001 - 01:03 am:   Edit Post Print Post

hello i am trying to win a contest and i have to translate this phrase if you can email me the it in english it would be much appriciated here it is


Ceud mile failte


heres my email addy
JC_Chasezgirl@webtv.net

If you can email asap it would be great!!
Thanx in advance

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Seosamh (1cust49.tnt48.nyc3.da.uu.net - 63.46.54.49)
Posted on Tuesday, July 17, 2001 - 11:37 am:   Edit Post Print Post

That's "100,000 welcomes" in Scots Gaelic. I won a contest once too with some basic knowledge of Celtic languages. Ach sin scéal eile. Another story.

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jpmartin (proxy.genevaonline.com - 156.46.205.21)
Posted on Saturday, July 21, 2001 - 06:57 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I need help with a translation. I have a family heirloom with the inscription "Fauch A Ballach". Can anyone advise as to what it means? I sincerely appreciate any help.

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Seosamh (2cust93.tnt52.nyc3.da.uu.net - 63.46.58.221)
Posted on Saturday, July 21, 2001 - 09:54 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

That seems to be the same as "Fág an bealach" in modern spelling. I means "leave the way" or "get out of the way". Besides being a common phrase used literally in everday language, it has also has been used in the past as a defiant challenge. It was the motto of an Irish brigade in the American Civil War. Maybe Seosamh M. (nó Barra, a mbeadh a fhios sin aige agus a bheadh i bhfolach thart anseo, b'fhéidir) would know how it was used in Ireland and whether it still can have that resonance in the Gaeltacht today. What type of heirloom is it?

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jpmartin (pm3-ppp112.genevaonline.com - 156.46.117.112)
Posted on Tuesday, July 24, 2001 - 01:24 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

The heirloom is a ship in a bottle which has that inscription along with the date of 1798.

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Silverspiral5 (aca325bf.ipt.aol.com - 172.163.37.191)
Posted on Sunday, August 05, 2001 - 02:37 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I'm in need of a spellchecker/grammar-checker for a poem that I wrote and translated into Gailic for use in an oil painting of a Celtic Spiral. Here's what I have:

Caslagh
Grian, cur to doorey dy griosach.
Abheis agus muir, bochuin dy drog.

I know what it SHOULD say, if anyone can translate it for me, it will put to rest my fears that it actually says, "The chicken has stolen my taco." :) Thanks!

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P Ferris (proxy3-external.vron1.nj.home.com - 24.4.252.86)
Posted on Wednesday, August 08, 2001 - 09:58 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Silverspiral,
To my non-Manx eyes, that looks more Manx Gaelic to me than Irish Gaelic.

Ghoid an shicín mo thaco = The chicken has stolen my taco
[roughly translated]. In the case that should that come up in conversation.

Paul

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Kathy Haslett (aca3491d.ipt.aol.com - 172.163.73.29)
Posted on Thursday, August 09, 2001 - 12:20 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you, Paul!
If you know of anyone who knows Manx Gaelic, please send them my way! This is what I wanted to say:
Spiral
Sun, eclipse to burning embers.
Oceans and seas, swell to crash.

Anyone--A second opinion?

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karen mulvihill (condatcorp.com - 152.160.12.204)
Posted on Wednesday, August 15, 2001 - 04:06 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I need the meaning of the word slainte. Please.

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Paul (proxy3-external.vron1.nj.home.com - 24.4.252.86)
Posted on Wednesday, August 15, 2001 - 07:50 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Karen: It means "health" and is often used as a toast.
Ádh mór/Good luck, Paul

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Leigh Rowan (dt0c4nc3.san.rr.com - 24.94.15.195)
Posted on Monday, August 27, 2001 - 07:13 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hello everyone!!

I am curious if anyone knows the translation to the overused by nonetheless wonderful Irish blessing that follows:

May the road rise to meet you.
May the wind be always at your back.
May the sun shine warm upon your face.
And rains fall soft upon your fields.
And until we meet again,
May God hold you in the hollow of His hand.

I thank you all for your help, and I am so glad to see that there is such a wonderful place to help keep Irish language and culture alive and real!!

Go raibh mile!

Leigh Rowan
rowan@leighrowan.com

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Kathy (ac812e0a.ipt.aol.com - 172.129.46.10)
Posted on Friday, September 07, 2001 - 12:32 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I am looking for a translation into English of a Gaelic word or phrase that (phonetically)sounds like "bob-da." Can anyone help? My thanks in advance.

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John Bauer (208.131.224.117)
Posted on Monday, September 10, 2001 - 01:10 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I need help. I left a job and my coworkers got together and got me a very fine gift and engraved upon was

Fear na mbo fein faoina heiraabaill


They wouldn't tell me what it meant. Can someone help? Thanks

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cristeoir (proxy1-ros.alphalink.com.au - 202.161.119.254)
Posted on Wednesday, September 12, 2001 - 10:05 am:   Edit Post Print Post

To go back to the original request on this thread, I'd advise Seamas (if he is still hanging on after 18 mths), that every language has its own thought processes which often makes what is a neat phrase in the original tongue sound clumsy or forced in translation.
Better to get something in Irish that has the flavor of what you like about the English piece. How about:
Is Gael mise,
Nach uasal sin?
Gael im' chroí
Agus Gael im'mheoin'.

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arlene harder (141.150.248.142)
Posted on Monday, September 24, 2001 - 04:33 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Sorry to jump in here, but I can't find a Create New Message button after scrolling to bottom of message board.

Perhaps you can help me with the above...or better yet:

Second generation Irish American. Very interested in learning > Gaelic/Irish...However, my first goal is to learn Sacred Irish hymns and > songs, both in English and Irish..Having the hardest time locating any good > sources. Perhaps you could help...Soprano Vocal and Piano, Sheet music and > lyrics needed. Thanks.

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Larry (213.122.53.214)
Posted on Monday, September 24, 2001 - 05:54 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Arlene, a chara,

Go to General Discussion (English and Irish) main page, and the button you're looking for is right down at the bottom. You may have to allow a little while for the whole page to load, but it's there.

I'm afraid, though, that I'm unable to help you with any of the songs/hymns you requested. Perhaps somebody else on here can assist you with that one ... ?

Mise le meas,
Larry.

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Seosaimhín Nic Rabhartaigh (spider-mtc-ti062.proxy.aol.com - 64.12.101.177)
Posted on Wednesday, October 10, 2001 - 09:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Just a thought on translations in general...

The Donegal poet, Cáthal O Searcaigh, when asked if he ever translated his own poetry ( he only writes in the Irish language) said:
" A translation is like a beautiful woman,
if it is beautiful, it is not faithful, and if it is faithful, it is not beautiful!"

Agus is fíor sin faoi h-aistriúcháin ar aon nós!( And that's true, about translations at any rate!)

Slán go fóill!
Seosaimhín

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Maria Tregorran (inktomi1-cam.server.ntl.com - 62.253.128.4)
Posted on Wednesday, October 31, 2001 - 09:01 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi there

Can someone please, please helo me translate two sentences from Irish friends of mine:

Firstly:
Ta me o deisceart crios mhic lionnain ach ta me i mo chonai i mbeal feirste anois

Secondly:
An bhfuil tu ag dul go crios mhic lionnain fa choinne an Nollaig?? Is maith liom Tir chonaill, an tra agus an pub............sin e mo dhomhain, agus beidh me i NDoire freisin!

Many thanks for any help you can offer

:o))

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Larry (host213-122-10-50.btinternet.com - 213.122.10.50)
Posted on Wednesday, October 31, 2001 - 06:08 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Maria, a chara,

I'm English and only a novice, but I'd translate as:

Firstly: = I am from south Crossmaglen but I live in Belfast now.

and Secondly: = Are you going to Crossmaglen for Christmas? I like Donegal, the beach and the pub....that's my world, and I'll be in Derry also.

(Perhaps somebody else has another translation??)

Le meas,
Larry.

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Jeff Carroll (p311.as3.adl.dublin.eircom.net - 159.134.229.55)
Posted on Friday, November 02, 2001 - 05:04 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Can anyone translate into Irish for me please. Much appreciated!!

Thank you for taking the time to read this document. We look forward to meeting with you in the near future. Please do not hesitate to contact our offices if you have any queries.

Thank you in advance.

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whatsthematter3@aol.com (spider-tm064.proxy.aol.com - 152.163.197.74)
Posted on Friday, November 16, 2001 - 02:42 am:   Edit Post Print Post

hello, if anyone would be able to give me a accurate translation in gaelic (irish) for "God Bless All Here" i would greatly appreciate. thanks in advance.roberta murphy zuczek, elizabeth,n.j. usa.whatsthematter3@aol.com

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Khaetlynne McClarin (216-171-196-16.dpe.net - 216.171.196.16)
Posted on Saturday, December 01, 2001 - 12:28 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Perhaps I havent looked hard enough, but might someone know the closest to "happy birthday" in irish gaelic?
Much appreciation-
Khaetlynne

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Larry (host213-122-17-156.btinternet.com - 213.122.17.156)
Posted on Saturday, December 01, 2001 - 05:01 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Happy birthday = Lá breithe shona duit

Le meas,
Larry

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Michael Benton (proxy1-external.santab1.ca.home.com - 24.4.254.48)
Posted on Saturday, December 01, 2001 - 03:39 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I'm throughly enjoying this site! While I'm at it, I'd greatly appreciate a translation of Philippians 4:8 (Bible)into Irish, as well as the basic "Merry Christmas" phrase translation. One last request, very dear to my heart, is the Irish word(s) or correct term for 'Towerhouse' or 'tower house'(may be two words). This in reference to those wonderful 15th & 16th century structures which dot the (Irish)landscape. Thank you in advance!

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Lúcas (bg-tc-ppp1603.monmouth.com - 64.19.130.29)
Posted on Sunday, December 02, 2001 - 12:19 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Filipigh 4:8 Mar fhocal scoir, a bhráithre, bíodh bhur n-aire ar an rud fíor, ar an rud uasal, ar an rud cóir, ar an rud naofa, ar an rud measúil, ar an rud creidiúnach, ar an rud atá suáilceach inmholta.

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Michael (proxy2-external.santab1.ca.home.com - 24.4.254.49)
Posted on Sunday, December 02, 2001 - 02:52 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you, Lucas! I will use this well!

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khaetlynne (216-171-199-3.dpe.net - 216.171.199.3)
Posted on Sunday, December 02, 2001 - 10:45 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you very much, Larry!
Much appreciated-
Khaetlynne

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Violet (209-19-253-246.customer.algx.net - 209.19.253.246)
Posted on Wednesday, December 05, 2001 - 03:16 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Please help! I am writing a book, and need translations, to Gaelig, for the following:

wheat
kingdom
evil
good
witch
powerful
danger
child

My most heartfelt thanks!

Violet

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Larry (host213-122-53-249.btinternet.com - 213.122.53.249)
Posted on Wednesday, December 05, 2001 - 05:16 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

wheat = cruithneacht
kingdom = riocht
evil = droch-
good = maith
witch = cailleach
powerful = cumhachtach
danger = contúirt
child = páiste

Le meas,
Larry.

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Dennis King (12.228.178.2)
Posted on Wednesday, December 05, 2001 - 05:55 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dearmad beag, síneadh fada ar lár:

riocht = form, shape
ríocht = kingdom

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Larry (host213-122-66-73.btinternet.com - 213.122.66.73)
Posted on Wednesday, December 05, 2001 - 11:15 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Aris, a Dennis, go raibh maith agat.

Le meas,
Larry.

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Violet (209-19-253-246.customer.algx.net - 209.19.253.246)
Posted on Friday, December 07, 2001 - 04:05 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you! Now, one more question. I am going to need some extensive passages translated to Gaelig. Does anyone know of a book (one I can find here in the U.S., preferrably at a library) that is a reliable and comprehensive resource?

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Larry (host213-122-15-123.btinternet.com - 213.122.15.123)
Posted on Saturday, December 08, 2001 - 04:23 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Violet, a chara,

Apart from the standard Irish-English dictionaries, I'm afraid that I know of no such volume that will be of much use if you wish to translate a number of extensive passages from English to Irish. There are a large number of textbooks available, however, for those who wish to learn the language as opposed to just a few phrases.

I'd suggest that you post your requests on this board where there are a number of experienced speakers who will be only too pleased to help you with translations.

Le meas,
Larry.

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Violet (209-19-253-246.customer.algx.net - 209.19.253.246)
Posted on Monday, December 10, 2001 - 11:30 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Dear Larry,

Wonderful!! I so appreciate this, and if I can get published, I'll be certain to acknowledge the efforts here!

Violet

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Violet (209-19-253-246.customer.algx.net - 209.19.253.246)
Posted on Tuesday, December 11, 2001 - 03:31 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A translation (of the text in quotations) to Gaelig, please:

"From time beginning
To time neverending
I am the portal to
Past, present, and future events
All one has to do is ask"

Many thanks.


Violet

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dave robertshaw (spider-mtc-tb053.proxy.aol.com - 64.12.104.43)
Posted on Tuesday, December 18, 2001 - 02:11 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

i am looking for the literal translation or derivation of
co latha breith sona dhuit, which is happy birthday. i have sewn this on a gift and would like to be able to share this with her. thankyou for your time and assitance.
have a merry
dave robertshaw

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Dennis King (12-228-30-111.client.attbi.com - 12.228.30.111)
Posted on Wednesday, December 19, 2001 - 12:39 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

It's Scottish Gaelic, not Irish. Co-latha-breith (birthday, literally something like 'equal-day-of-birth') + sona (happy) + dhuit (to you). It would be understandable in Irish if you changed the first part to "breithlá" or "lá breithe". Or you can say "Go maire tú an lá!"

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CortneyPayne (139.142.135.37 - 139.142.135.37)
Posted on Monday, January 06, 2003 - 01:36 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Good day!

I need help. I am getting a tattoo of a celtic trinity knot and I would like something gaelic (irish gaelic) underneath it. I was wondering if anyone could give me a gaelic saying that would be appropriate? Something along the lines of

Beauty is everlasting or
divinity is within you

help!
thank you
Cortney

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Monday, January 06, 2003 - 11:33 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Diagacht ionat = "Divinity in you" in a singular context.

Diagacht ionaibh = "Divinity in you" in a plural sense.

Diagacht istigh = "Divinity within"

Irish utilizes a unique grammar component called the prepositional pronoun. It is essentially a pronoun contracted with a preposition that conveys location or relationship of the subject. In the examples I've given "ionat" is a contraction of "i" meaning "in" and "tú" meaning you. Together you get "in you". Ionaibh is the contraction fo "i" and "sibh", giving the meaning of "in you" but implying more than one person.

I don't know of a prepositional pronoun involving "istigh". This is not to say that one does not exist, I simply do not know it if it does.

Is síoraí, an Áilleacht would be a loose translation of "Beauty is eternal". I'm less sure of this translation so don't commit it to skin until someone else confirms or modifies it.

Think twice about ink--it's there forever!

Le meas,

James

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CortneyPayne (139.142.135.37 - 139.142.135.37)
Posted on Monday, January 06, 2003 - 02:30 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you James. Just wondering if cailleach istigh means witch within. Is that correct?

Thanks
Cortney

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Monday, January 06, 2003 - 03:59 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

You're falling into a common error. "Witch" is an english word. From a culture/context perspective no such word exists in Irish. The closest I could get would be:

Bean Feasa = Literally, "woman of knowledge" but used to indicate one with a gift of second sight.

There is also the word(s):

Bean slieve = "Woman of the Hill" which is, I believe, the origin of "Banshee". Not exactly a witch but with some similar connotations.

It's not as easy as english word = Irish word. That's what makes the language so darned difficult, and, for some of us, so darned fun!!!

Also, I'm not sure how "istigh" translates when you're talking about inside a being. I've only just begun understanding Irish so get some other input before taking my suggestions as "gospel."

Le meas,

James

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Cortney (139.142.135.37 - 139.142.135.37)
Posted on Monday, January 06, 2003 - 04:28 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

thanks James

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cortney (139.142.135.37 - 139.142.135.37)
Posted on Monday, January 06, 2003 - 05:52 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

How would I pronounce bean feasa without sounding like an idiot?
Thanks cortney

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Monday, January 06, 2003 - 07:25 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Again, this is just my best shot. I'm not a native speaker by any stretch!

Bean (pronounced like "Band" but without the "D" sound on the end and the "aaa" sound is pronounced from further back in the throat/mouth than from the front like would be done in the U.S.)

Feasa (Somewhat like "Fay-sha" with the accent on the "Fay". The "ay" sound would be somewhat muted...more of a mix between "Fay" and "Fe")

I know that's probably more confusing than helpful but I think it's close.

I REALLY wish some of the native speakers would catch on to this conversation we've been having. I feel a bit unqualified to be giving you such advice without having had some more seasoned input.

Le meas,

James

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.170 - 193.122.47.170)
Posted on Monday, January 06, 2003 - 08:40 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Dia Dhaoibh, A James agus Cortney,

I've been following the thread and James translations are pretty good. I'm not a native speaker but I grew up learning Irish in Ireland.

I could give an alternative for "Beauty is everlasting"
Bíonn áilleacht buan (Beauty is neverchanging).
You could also say "Bíonn áilleacht buan síoraí" which means "beauty is neverchanging everlasting"


You pronounce Bean Feasa in my part of Ireland like this: "Ban Fassa" - both a's like in mat.
I understand a Bean Feasa as a woman with knowledge of the occult.

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Monday, January 06, 2003 - 08:56 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Oliver, A Chara:

Cá bhfuil bhí tú ag foghlaim gaeilge? I'm always curious as to the different dialects. I'm learning from a book that teaches the Cois Fhairrge (Galway, etc) dialect. Where did you learn your particular "brand"? How do you find comprhending the spoken word of others--easy, difficult,impossible???

Le meas,

James

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.170 - 193.122.47.170)
Posted on Monday, January 06, 2003 - 09:52 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Shéamais, a chara,
D'fhoghlaim mé an Caighdéan Oifigiul cosúil le gach dálta scoile eile sna 70s agus 80s. Deirtear go bhfuil an Caighdéan bunaithe go mór mór ar gaeilge na Connachta, agus ceapaim go bhfuil an ceart acú mar is féidir liom Maigh Eo agus Gaillimh a thuiscint (scriobhta ar aon nós) ach ní thuigim diabhal ar bith as an Mumhan agus faighim ach na cnámha as Tír Conaill.

As for spoken Irish, I have to say I can only understand Galway and Mayo in terms of following the meaning, I can make out some words from Donegal but Munster is lost on me. I'm amazed at how much interest there is among foreign learners about the dialects, to me they're kind of a nuisance and a bar to communication.

As you get to learn more Irish it will become more apparent to you.

This page gives an overview, but it's the vocab that's the main problem.

http://www.smo.uhi.ac.uk/gaeilge/gramadach/canuinti.html

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Daniel (24.147.224.67 - 24.147.224.67)
Posted on Tuesday, January 07, 2003 - 05:39 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hello,

Sorry to be so corporate-sounding, but I am stuck on a work-related translation request.

My Irish colleagues and I are starting a new financial services firm in the States and, in our company name, would like to stress the concepts of "collaboration" (or "collaborative") and "virtues" (two concepts not usually present in this industry). Is there any Gaelic (Irish) word, term, or short phrase that could somehow incorporate these concepts, yet not be too long, since I'd like to use it in a company name?

I know it's a long shot, but I would appreciate any help.

Thanks,
Dan

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Tuesday, January 07, 2003 - 08:55 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi Daniel,

These are translations below. Dunno how you could snazzy it up though - Irish isn't really designed for that kind of misuse.

comhar = Collaboration (pron. coh - ur)
suáilce = virtue (pron. sue-oil -keh)
suáilceach = virtuous (pron. sue-oil-kuh)

Sounds like you are taking an ethical approach to business, probably not a bad idea post Enron :-).
As the proverb goes:

Molann an obair an fear.
The work praises the man.

Maybe you should look up Irish proverbs for ideas, there's some on this site and the entire web is alive with them.

Anyway, hope this helps.

Beir Bua (lit. get a win)

Oliver.

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patrick (152.163.188.1 - 152.163.188.1)
Posted on Tuesday, January 07, 2003 - 10:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I am hoping someone can help me translate the saying below into Irish Gaelic:

"in memory of the souls of loved ones called home"

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Alyse Kinne (166.102.201.115 - 166.102.201.115)
Posted on Thursday, January 16, 2003 - 09:27 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Please help with translation: When I was a child and was either tattling or criticizing someone else, my father would say what sounded like "So lahngah sahl" in Gaelic. I would love to know how to spell it and its literal meaning. From context, I assumed it meant "look to thyself"--
Thanks for your help. Alyse Kinne

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.103 - 193.1.100.103)
Posted on Thursday, January 16, 2003 - 10:18 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Alyse, a chara,

He seems to have been saying 'Slán gach samhail'. (= safe every likeness)
It is a much used phrase for 'God bless the mark'.
We may assume from your context that 'may we have no bad news' might serve as your meaning?
Or 'may your cry not be heard on the other side'!
Was your father from the northern half of Ireland?

Slán go fóill.

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Alyse Kinne (166.102.201.123 - 166.102.201.123)
Posted on Thursday, January 16, 2003 - 12:35 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

My father's parents were from Counties Cavan and Westmeath. My father was born in CT, USA. Thank you so much. Atleast he usually got me to shut up! Alyse

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.103 - 193.1.100.103)
Posted on Thursday, January 16, 2003 - 02:31 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Beannacht Dé ar anamnacha na marbh.

God rest their souls.

Imagine how long this phrase went back in your family lines. Who knows. Various firesides and gardens on both sides of the Atlantic.

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Al Evans (208.188.101.145 - 208.188.101.145)
Posted on Thursday, January 16, 2003 - 05:18 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

No expert I, but....

Could it have been something like

'S ó lán go sabhail

Meaning something like "may you/we be saved from pride"?

Please feel free to tell me if that's an ignorant solution:-)

--Al Evans

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Cheryl (66.214.116.182 - 66.214.116.182)
Posted on Friday, January 17, 2003 - 11:06 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I have come across the following Irish names and do not know how to pronunciate them; Aingeal, Cadhla and Cahira. If anyone can help me, please tell me how to say these beautiful names correctly.
Cheryl

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Antóin (159.134.181.93 - 159.134.181.93)
Posted on Saturday, January 18, 2003 - 03:11 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Aingeal - pronounce as English word 'angle'

Cadhla - Kye (rhymns with 'my') + lah. This is a guess based on the spelling as I'm not familiar with the name.

Cahira. I've never heard that name and the spelling is not standard Irish, where the letter 'h' always follows a consonant.

Any other suggestions?

Ádh Mór
Antóin

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Cheryl (66.214.116.182 - 66.214.116.182)
Posted on Monday, January 20, 2003 - 12:57 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Antóin, thanks for your help! My husband and I are trying to find some unique Irish girl names for our baby to be.
Cheryl

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Pádraig Mac Gafraidh (205.244.12.58 - 205.244.12.58)
Posted on Monday, January 20, 2003 - 11:16 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A Chairde,

This talk of girl names resurrected a question I've long had about the name of the a character in Synge's "Playboy of the Western World." The English, I believe was Pegeen Mike. Little Peggy, perhaps? But where does the Mike come from?

P.

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Tuesday, January 21, 2003 - 02:13 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Maidhc was her father's name. It is the custom in rural Ireland even in English speaking parts to identify people by their ancestors. So you have people called Tom Neidí Sheáin where Neidí is the father and Seán the grandfather.

In my own village in Ireland we have people known as Johny Pat Mick, Martin Andy, Mick Una etc. It's because they all have the same surname so it distinguishes them.

Slán

Oliver.

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Landon (172.174.55.16 - 172.174.55.16)
Posted on Sunday, January 26, 2003 - 11:32 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hello Just need a translation to Irish:

Irish Pride

Thank you in advance.

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.103 - 193.1.100.103)
Posted on Monday, January 27, 2003 - 03:53 am:   Edit Post Print Post

What you seek may be :

Mórtas an Éireannaigh

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Landon (172.138.81.51 - 172.138.81.51)
Posted on Monday, January 27, 2003 - 03:16 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you. I have one more quick question though. What is the difference between bród na nÉireannach and Mórtas an Éireannaigh?? Thanks for the help.

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Monday, January 27, 2003 - 04:41 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

My dictionary gives the following explanation:

bród = arrogance or elation. To be proud of an achievement.


Mórtas = pride of race. This is addressed specifically under Mórtas while implied, at best, under bród.

I think this is one of those areas where they both translate into english as the same thing but sounds one right to the native ear while the other sounds so completely off that it doesn't "mean" anything. (Not that I'm a native speaker--this is just my speculation)
Hope this helps.

James

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Landon (172.145.39.108 - 172.145.39.108)
Posted on Monday, January 27, 2003 - 07:20 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Thanks a million. You were more than helpful. I hope to one day learn Irish as a spoken and written language. Thanks again,

Landon

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James (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Monday, January 27, 2003 - 07:41 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Tá fáilte romhat!

When you're ready to pick it up it's a great language. Not necessarily an easy one but an absolutely fascinating one! Just come back to this site and we'll get you started. What you do and where you go from there will be totally up to you!

go n-éirí leat!

Le meas,

James

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Seosamh Mac Muirí (193.1.100.103 - 193.1.100.103)
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 04:54 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Landon a chara,

Just on our feet here in Ireland to find your second question : What is the difference between 'bród na nÉireannach' and 'Mórtas an Éireannaigh'??

As the same question may lurk in the minds of other Daltaí readers as to why I didn't go for a plural (... na nÉireannach), aside altogether from the matter of word selection, it is no harm to let you know that singular and plural is one area where the two languages diverge. Irish prefers a singular. English tends the other way : The luck of the Irish (people).

Fliuchfar an té a chorraíos amach inniu.
versus
Those who venture out today shall be wet.

Languages think differently in some areas. Part of learning is adjusting how you think and finding the proper words to fit into the mode. Go for it, one day sooner rather than later!

Ádh mór.

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Landon (172.144.123.157 - 172.144.123.157)
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 03:46 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

I want to start learning now but I am going to Japan for 2 years and trying to learn 2 languages at the same time will be a bit difficult. I plan to learn soon though. I do understand what you are saying about plural and singular though. Thanks for the help. I will deffinately be a regular here now. Oh what does Ádh mór mean?

Landon

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Paul (64.21.69.3 - 64.21.69.3)
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 04:05 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Landon, a chara:
I understand there are quite a lot of people learning Irish in Japan. If I hear of any details/websites, I'll let you know.
Slan/Sayonara,
Paul

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james (209.48.182.219 - 209.48.182.219)
Posted on Tuesday, January 28, 2003 - 04:32 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Ádh mór ort and (agus) go n-éirí leat both mean "good luck". In both you see the use of something called a prepositional pronoun which is relatively unique to the Celtic languages. Ort means on you while leat means with you. They are contractions of ar + tú and le = tú respectively. (This is what is known as a "tease" to get you to want to learn more :) )

Have a great two years in Japan. I did a one year tour in Korea (unaccompanied hardship tour--no wife, no kid) and had a wonderful experience. I tried to learn Korean but lacked the motivation I have for Irish. I picked up a few words and learned to read Hangul (read--not translate!) You'll make the most of the two years in Japan, I'm sure.

Le meas,

James

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willfulspryte (66.0.183.129 - 66.0.183.129)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 11:02 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Requesting some help.... I am hosting a lunch social for St. Patrick's Day and am looking for "known" phrases and quotes that I can have posted for "decoration" with their meanings / translations from irish / gaelic to english. I don't know any sayings at all, but if anyone could help me with this it would be greatly appreciated. Please keep it clean this will be a family event. But anything fun and festive would be wonderful! Please email me with suggestions.. Thanks again for your help.

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Pádraig Mac G. (63.161.61.105 - 63.161.61.105)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 01:19 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

If you go to the main menu of this website and click on "Proverbs" and then surf around, you'll probably find all you're looking for.

Slán, P.

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Maidhc Ó Gáibhtheacháin (68.168.82.218 - 68.168.82.218)
Posted on Wednesday, February 19, 2003 - 01:36 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

A chara,
An excellent start would be simply to go to the proverbs and phrases pages in this site. There's a whole litany of choices of things to say written in Gaeilge and english and includung sound so that you might here them spoken as well. Also, you might add "Fáilte Romhat Isteach" (You are welcome, please come in.) above the entrance and "Slán abhaile" (Have a safe trip home.) above the exit. And also "Lá Fhéile Pádraig Shona" ( Happy St. Patrick's Day!)
Slán,
Maidhc.

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Oliver Grennan (193.122.47.162 - 193.122.47.162)
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 02:06 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Maidhc,
Sorry but I myself have been corrected on this b4:

It's
"Lá Fhéile Pádraig Sona"

no "h" becoz the word Lá is masc.

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Maidhc Ó Gáibhtheacháin (68.168.82.218 - 68.168.82.218)
Posted on Thursday, February 20, 2003 - 10:25 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Go raibh maith agat, a chara.
Le meas,
Maidhc.

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