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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2002 (January-June) » How can I learn Gaelic if there is no one in my area to teach it:? « Previous Next »

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Ashley (spider-wo044.proxy.aol.com - 205.188.200.39)
Posted on Saturday, April 15, 2000 - 07:59 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Besides books, which are hard to learn from because of pronunciation problems how else can I learn Gaelic? I am 12 and I can't get into adult classes...suggestions????or maybe a good beginning book??
Thank you!

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Antaine
Posted on Saturday, April 15, 2000 - 11:23 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

1 a good dictionary that translates in both directions for vocabulary. the little blue and
orange one they sell on this website (under "shop") I highly recommend.

2 "Teach Yourself: Irish" is good for grammar. It teaches the southern Munster dialect,
but that's fine. There is a version that comes with tapes. That will let you hear the
sound of the language and serve as a grammatical reference. Be sure NOT to buy
anything that says "gaelic" on it. If you do, you have bought materials on Scottish, not
Irish. Look for "Irish" or "Gaeilge"

3 Copy the grammar rules for verbs and prepositions from this site, it is rather difficult
to get a comprehensive "all in one spot" set of rules for those common constructions.

4 "Briathra na Gaeilge: Regular and Irregular" This is a book which conjugates examples
of common verbs and all the irregular verbs for you. Very hard to come by, I had to order
mine from a little bookshop in New York. If you ask Liam
(daltai@daltai.com ...he's in
charge), I'm sure he will be happy to supply you with the name, phone# and address of
the place (trust me, it's worth it)

There is really no one book that can substitute for a live, 98.6 degree teacher, but all of
these combined will allow you to get the basics, and formulate your own sentences. #3
is, of course, free, but won't make too much sense without #2. If you don't have the
means to purchase all of these things, in order of importance, they are #2, #1, #4.

Feel confident buying anything that says "An Gúm" or is copyright, "Rialtas na hÉireann"
Those are as official as you can get, Rialtas na hÉireann meaning the Government of
Ireland.

I hope this has been helpful. What you need to do is to decide just how much you would
like to learn. Conversational tape courses work as quickly as you can memorize, but
you only learn how to say what they teach, not to make your own sentences. Two
suggestions, one of which is essential and the other is highly recommended would be
1 Essential - learn WITH someone. A few friends or your parents if you can. Use what
you learn every day. As with any language, if you have no one with which to speak, you
will quickly forget what you have learned. It's tough at first, but stick with it, it's worth
it, especially if you like poetry.
2 Highly recommended - find a penpal...someone who's fluent...to write to. This will
make sure that you're not learning any mistakes, but if you're careful, it's not entirely
necessary.

Go n-éirí an t-adh leat!
(Good luck!)
(guh NAY-ree un TAW-d lutt)
..................

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Joanne Holland (cvx1-138.madison.chorus.net - 216.165.189.138)
Posted on Tuesday, May 02, 2000 - 01:15 am:   Edit Post Print Post

To try at age twelve to learn a language without a teacher may be very difficult; but you can learn songs and later the words will mean something to you. It is one of the easiest ways to start getting a little bit of the language and there are many records and tapes with Irish words with the music. Use other sources to trace the meaning of the words, not just the translation on the jacket. Most people will enjoy your music and encourage you to continue. Don't give up.

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Kay
Posted on Thursday, May 04, 2000 - 06:23 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Just to help people like you who may not have access to a teacher I have set up a website which will very soon have a hundred pages of information. There is grammar, vocabularly, occasionally stories and I have also included a page of links to sites which will give you further help. Some of the sites I link to will give sound examples. I link to newspapers and publications in Irish too as well as sites which will supply you with music and story C.Ds. I have recently updated the site to make it easier to navigate. Don't be intimidated by the grammar you can always refer to my pages when in difficulty!

Kay

http://www.iol.ie/~sefton

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williamfuller ( - 199.80.100.23)
Posted on Saturday, May 06, 2000 - 09:45 am:   Edit Post Print Post

"Irish for Everyone has been the most helpful for me.Gabh mo leithsceal; Ihad meant to quote only the first three words of the opening sentence!...But if you can get any book (or even a phrase- list), then ask a friend to listen to your ansers to the exercises. The friend will in the process pick up at least some vocabulary & then you can to that extent converse. Pronunciation can be worked on later.

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Christine (spider-mtc-ti012.proxy.aol.com - 64.12.101.152)
Posted on Tuesday, February 06, 2001 - 11:40 am:   Edit Post Print Post

a chairde
As much as I have enjoyed the lessons offered by Daltaí, I was getting nowhere until I could hear the language and found book and tapes "Irish on Your Own" by Éamonn Ó Dónaill and Deirbhile Ní Churraighín at Barnes and Noble. The accent is from Belfast and very different from the CD by Transparent Language, Inc. which uses the southern dialect (available at some Computer stores)
The Irish Bookstore on-line where I ordered two dictionaries (Irish/English and English/Irish) seems to have joined Amazon.com, which couldn't mean they're any more efficient or helpful than when I ordered from them. I couldn't find these comprehensive dictionaries at any local bookstore.

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CailinDoll (spider-mtc-ti031.proxy.aol.com - 64.12.101.161)
Posted on Thursday, June 14, 2001 - 11:34 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Ashley, If you're on AOL there's a live e-mail class at 7-9 on Sunday evenings with the amazingly entertaining grammar god himself 'HOST INTL GAEL'. It's unfortunately only open to AOL folks, but if you have an aol account, log on Sundays from 7-9 and instant message HOST INTL GAEL and he will send you a link to the classroom.

Ádh mór ort!
Colleen

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Oilbhe (p84.as1.exs.dublin.eircom.net - 159.134.224.84)
Posted on Thursday, July 05, 2001 - 06:07 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hi Ashley,

I am a beginner at Irish and have been using a CD from a company in Dublin, Ceol Software. The web address is www.ceolsoft.com. The CD has many words with their pronunciation, sentences and grammar. I really have found it very useful and hope it is of help to you.

Good luck,

Oilbhe.

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Kelly White (cc363458-d.twsn1.md.home.com - 67.160.58.113)
Posted on Saturday, November 03, 2001 - 09:12 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Hey Ashley! I am 14 and also trying to learn Irish, but my parents think I should be learning a 'sensible' language like French. I am also having difficulty finding somewhere to learn stuff, so tell me if you find anything good!

-Kelly

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Kay (p12.as1.prp.dublin.eircom.net - 159.134.168.12)
Posted on Wednesday, November 07, 2001 - 01:43 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Just a note to say that I have changed my website
Gaeilge na Seachtaine

To:

http://homepage.eircom.net/~kuichinneide/

The site will be kept up to date at the new address. I cannot now access the previous site to update it.

Kay.

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madra (ny-lackawanna5a-444.buf.adelphia.net - 24.48.121.188)
Posted on Wednesday, January 02, 2002 - 11:31 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I agree with listening to music with Irish words in order to learn Irish. Eithne Ní Bhraonáin (Enya) is not only an excellent musician, she's also teaching me Irish!

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