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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2000 (January-June) » meaning of the word "aroon" « Previous Next »

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cathycole
Posted on Tuesday, February 22, 2000 - 11:15 am:   Edit Post Print Post

I recently received an antique silver bracelet with two green marble shamrocks and the word "aroon" on it. Does anyone know the meaning of this word?

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Risteárd (gray.cam.cornell.edu - 132.236.122.24)
Posted on Tuesday, February 22, 2000 - 12:42 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

The Irish phrase "A rún" (pronounced "a roon") is a term of affection, roughly meaning "My dear" or "My loved one".

Risteárd.

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Seosamh
Posted on Tuesday, February 22, 2000 - 12:48 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

"Aroon" is one of those English-language cloaks that people put on words and phrases from Irish. It would be written "a rún" in Irish and means "sweetheart", "love", "dear": a beloved person in general. It's in the vocative case (that is, direct address) and the equivalent in English would most likely be "my sweetheart" or "my dear".

The Irish motifs on things from greeting cards to jewelry show variation and continuity over the years. The bracelet sounds interesting. Go maire tú é. (May you live to wear it -- a traditional thing to say to someone who has just come by something new to wear.)

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Seosamh (1cust186.tnt6.nyc3.da.uu.net - 63.11.190.186)
Posted on Tuesday, February 22, 2000 - 12:54 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Gabh mo leithscéal, a Ristéard. Ní fhaca mé an freagra seo agat go dtí gur chuir mé mo fhreagra féin 'na bhealaigh.

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