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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2000 (January-June) » Mo chuisle means 'my darling' « Previous Next »

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lisa dipietrantonio
Posted on Sunday, January 16, 2000 - 03:08 am:   Edit Post Print Post

My mother always used an irish word for "loved one" I've tried looking it up in dictionaries but
cannot find it. My mother might have been mispronouncing it. It sounded like Maakooshala.
does this ring a bell?

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Lúcas
Posted on Sunday, January 16, 2000 - 09:02 am:   Edit Post Print Post

A Lisa, a Chara,

I think that might be "mo chuisle," which would fit the phonetic spelling you have. "Mo" is the possessive adjective for "my". "Cuisle" is a colloquial term for "darling" according to the Collins Pocket Irish Dictionary,that also means 'vein', 'pulse', 'forearm or wrist', and 'flute' according to Ó Dónaill's Foclóir Gaeilge-Bearla. Dineen's Foclóir Gaedhilge agus Béarla, refers to it simply as a 'term of endearment'. The possessive adjective softens (séimhiú) the first syllable of the noun it modifies, therefore, 'mo chuisle' means 'my darling' or 'my beloved one'. This grammatical form would be used if she were talking about 'her loved one'. If she were talking to her 'loved one' then she would use the vocative case, 'a chuisle'. Several dictionaries list the vocative form 'a chuisle mo chroí' (my heart's beloved).

Mise,

Lúcas

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lisadipietrantonio
Posted on Monday, January 17, 2000 - 01:32 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Thank you so much
May all your days be blessed!

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