mainoff.gif
lastdyoff.gif
lastwkoff.gif
treeoff.gif
searchoff.gif
helpoff.gif
contactoff.gif
creditsoff.gif
homeoff.gif


The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2000 (January-June) » Translation Help: Irish to English « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Thomas Muench
Posted on Tuesday, January 11, 2000 - 08:57 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Could anyone give me a translation of the bracketed part of the following sentence (from the first paragraph of Ar Son A Charad):

Gan aon agó, [bi a scar féin den dá chuid á fáil ag] muintir an baile úd Lodestone, amigh san larthar fhiáin.

Except for the bracketed part, I think it reads:
Without any doubt, [...] people of the town Lodestone over there, out in the wild west.

Just to put it in conText, this takes place in the American west in the middle 1800's, and the rest of the paragraph goes on to describe a your boy going home for his midday meal.

I have a translation for individual words in the brackets, but together they don't mean anyting sensible to me relative to the story. I am beginning to guess that it may be something very idiomatic which my dictionary doesn't mention.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dennis King (donncha.ndip.eskimo.net - 207.54.13.247)
Posted on Wednesday, January 12, 2000 - 02:25 am:   Edit Post Print Post

bhí a scair féin den dá chuid á fáil ag =
(they) were getting their own share of both

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Thomas Muench
Posted on Friday, January 14, 2000 - 02:10 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Ah, the meaning of "an dá chuid" as "both" was just the idiom that I didn't find, even in the big Irish-English dictionary which does give many idioms. Although this phrase for "both" is in the English-Irish dictionary.

I had ended up with something like "their part of the second part", which sounded more like a legal contract than a novel and which made no sense in the story.

"Both" now nicely refers to the "heat" and "dryness" in the previous sentence.

Thanks.

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dennis King (donncha.ndip.eskimo.net - 207.54.13.247)
Posted on Friday, January 14, 2000 - 02:43 pm:   Edit Post Print Post

Interestingly, the idiom "an dá chuid" is much more prevalent in Scottish Gaelic, where you commonly say things like "an dà chuid bainne agus siùcar" (both milk and sugar).

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

isevier
Posted on Saturday, January 15, 2000 - 12:33 am:   Edit Post Print Post

Could someome please give me the translation of this.
Sinne Fianna Fáil, atá faoi gheall ag Éireann, buidhean dár sluagh tár túinn do ráinig chughainn, Fámhoid bheith saor, sean-tír ár sinnsear feasta, ní fágfar faion tíorán na faoin tráil,anocht a theigheamh sa bearna baoghail, le gean ar geadhil chun bháis nó saoghail,le gunna screach, faoi lamhach na píléar,seo libh canaidh Amhrán na bhFiann...........TIOCFAIDH ÁR LÁ!!!

thank u much!

Add Your Message Here
Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.


©Daltaí na Gaeilge