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The Daltaí Boards » Archive: 1999-2004 » 2003 (April-June) » 1999 » non religios greeting « Previous Next »

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deaglan
Posted on Friday, November 26, 1999 - 05:59 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

A Chairde,
are there any (common) greetings without a religious overtone ie dia dhuit..

go raibh maith agait
deaglan

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Riobárd
Posted on Saturday, November 27, 1999 - 12:18 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

A Chara,
I really don't know if this is what you are looking for but, I asked the same question to a teacher and native speaker, and she told me haló. I have been using the same greeting ever since, and have never been corrected. However, maybe they were just being nice.

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SeanFurlong
Posted on Friday, December 03, 1999 - 04:33 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

In earlier centuries, it was the usual thing throughout Europe to give greetings and farewells with religious overtone. For instance, the English phrase "goodbye" derives from an abbreviation of "God be with you". Similary, in Germany and Austria practically all of the greetings currently in use have religious origins.

Since Gaelic has been a practically brain dead language for the last century and a half, it didn't evolve more modern forms of greetings.

However, Haló is quite acceptable. Haló is derived from the English Hello, which originates from a greeting convention used by Bell Telephone operators in the early years of the phone system in America.

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Máire Ní Ógáin (netcache2.mot.com - 129.188.33.222)
Posted on Friday, December 03, 1999 - 07:03 am:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

"More modern"? A greeting which happens to include the name of God hardly qualifies it as primitive.

It's quite common in modern spoken Irish (which still exists quite happily, contrary to the opinions of Mr Furlong) to skip the formal greeting and say Heileó, Cad é mar atá tú/Conas atá tú/Cén chaoi a bhfuil tú (How are you). Then the greeting can change according to the situation, too e.g. Maidin mhaith for Hello, Good morning or Fáilte isteach for Hello, come in.

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Aonghus (cw03.b1.srv.t-online.de - 212.185.252.3)
Posted on Friday, December 03, 1999 - 12:58 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

Tá lán cheart agat, a Mháire.
Ach ceapann an t-Uasal Furlong gur cheart dúinn ar fad a bheith ag labhairt c++ in áit gaeilge!

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Seosamh
Posted on Sunday, December 05, 1999 - 02:37 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

There is an element of brain-deadness in borrowing terms like hello, bye, OK, hello and f**k, but Irish has plenty of company. These words are spreading through much of the world just like they spread through more limited areas in the past few centuries. It's part of global levelling (mise a cheap é).

Irish and other minority languages mostly skipped the relatively recent bourgeois stage that gave us some of our more formal greetings. So what? Irish has caught up and has its rich traditional system of greetings as well. A language is no more brain-dead than the people who speak it and there are reasons why Irish-speakers might generally be a notch or two higher than English-speakers, if anything.

Besides 'haló' and 'haigh', a more tradional way, Deaglan, would be to just start off with a remark about the weather. Beir bua is beannacht. Beirigí go léir amhlaidh!

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Deaglán da Barra
Posted on Sunday, December 05, 1999 - 08:14 pm:   Small TextLarge TextEdit Post Print Post

A chairde,

go raibh maith agaibh ar fad le do eolas cabhrach.

is mise le meas,
Deaglán

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